Five African Women in the Creative Industries You Should be Following On Instagram

The modern African woman is not just a doctor, lawyer or UN project manager. She is in true millennial style – an artist at heart, who crave side hustles that doubles as her creative outlets.

More than ever, African women on the continent and of the diaspora are slaying roles in writing, art direction, creative marketing, architecture, and design.

If you’re looking for jobs at agencies who work on projects that reflect your home or want to stay posted on artistic journeys in the continent’s creative hubs, keep reading this article.



Here are five women in the creative industries you should know about, contact and work with! Click To Tweet

Asiyami Gold

Asiyami Gold is one of the continent’s most notable Instagram influencer’s who is consistently revered in hundreds of comments for being authentic and inimitable in her storytelling as well as her work.

Her personal storytelling does not hold an essentialist, romantic nor exotic gaze of the continent.

Rather, everything she does, from her presets to her consulting, shows the continent the way it is— a mix of technological innovations and idiosyncratic socio-economies, with a shared political history.

Gold is the Founder and CEO of the creative agency A Gold Studio and has worked with clients like Furla, Pantene, HERE map and Christian Cody.

Amy Sall

Amy Sall is the founder of digital magazine SUNU:  forthcoming print and digital publication.

 Even before the launch of the Journal, Sall’s tens of thousands of Instagram followers have known her best for making pre-colonial and historic media (film, TV, photography, interviews, reports etc) from the continent accessible by sharing images and stories that scream “for us, by us and of us”—foreshadowing the meaning of “sunu”, the Wolof word for “our”. 

Chidera Eggerue AKA @theslumflower

Chidera or @theslumflower is the award-winning author of the book What a Time to be Alone, a speaker, and an all round epicentre for inspiration, tough love and ultimately self-love.

A few months ago, a friend of mine suggested that I follow @theslumflower on Instagram, and my life has never been the same since!

Sis is all about being unapologetically self-loving, creative, independent and successful.

If you want to write, design or create but you’re feeling like as an African woman, there are certain worries that you work through alone, then following @theslumflower will give you enough inspiration to turn your #hotgirlsummer into a #hotgirlyear.

Mamy Tall

Mamy Tall is a Senegalese powerhouse, an architect, a photographer, and art director whose work has been featured on Livingly and Le Petit Journal

In December 2018, Tall’s art direction for the music video of Nix’s Highlander, won Video of the Year at the Galsen Hip Hop Awards.

Mamy Tall’s instagram content is a mix of architectural design and inspiration, art direction, photography, fashion, a non-replicable tourist eye and all round African excellence. 

Nadia Marie Sasso

Nadia Marie Sassois an unconventional digital storyteller from Sierra Leone based in Los Angeles.

She often combines critical writing and research with digital media in film, music, and fashion. Named among Katie Couric’s “Next Generation of Female Leaders”.

Sasso’s recent film Am I: Too African to be American or Too American to be African? has been featured on media platforms, such as Centric, Jet, The Huffington Post, Blavity, The ColorLines, OkayAfrica, Black Enterprise, and AfroPunk— and recognized by film festivals nationally and internationally.

Sasso’s journey is one of triumph— one quick scroll through her IG, and you’re bound to overcome any mood you’re in and want to slay your start-up goals.


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Yanoh Jalloh: Fixing severe disparities and health inequities in Sierra Leone

From developing reproductive health programs for young girls in Kabala Sierra Leone, to managing high level projects funded by the center for Disease Control. Yanoh Jalloh is well equipped to provide high quality research, programmatic and training expertise to organisations focused on health and development in African countries and the United States. Born to Sierra Leonean parents in the United States, Yanoh’s passion to contributing to healthy sustainable societies by providing evidence based research driven programs, tools and resources has always been evident. Over the last decade, she has garnered the necessary experience from working with local and international Non-Governmental organisations in Africa, to high level university research institutes in the United States.  In this  interview, Yanoh Jalloh shares her career journey with young women in Sierra Leone, and her hopes to inspire and encourage them along their own journeys.
Women interested in public health - do not get into this industry for the money. It is a field that can be riveting, emotional, draining, but very fulfilling - @YKayJ Click To Tweet 

Describe yourself in one sentence?

I am a motivated, skilled and experienced international development specialist with close to a decade of’ experience of working with hard to reach populations of youth and on projects in Sierra Leone.

What motivates you to develop healthier societies in Africa?

Though I was born in the states, my family is originally from Sierra Leone and I have always felt a compelling call to respond to the severe disparities and health inequities in Sub- Saharan Africa.

Tell us about your public health background and how it relates to your Sierra Leonean heritage?

I obtained my Masters’ in Public Health with a concentration in Global Health in 2012, in 2011 during my practicum experience, I started working on the ground in Sierra Leone with the NGO Helen Keller International. It was during this experience that I was able to hone in on my research and evaluation skills as I worked on a project which aimed to redesign the national child health card. I also evaluated a multi-faceted nutrition intervention that was being implemented in several clinics throughout Freetown, Sierra Leone. Since then, I have been working both domestically on abroad on both short-term and long-term projects that mainly aim to improve health outcomes. I have also worked with organisations in providing evaluation support and planning.

What are some career challenges you face?

I am in my early 30’s but I started working in this field in my mid 20’s. Age has often been a barrier and a challenge. When you are young, you often lose opportunities to candidates who may have more years of experience, but are not necessarily as seasoned as you in a particular skill. I am also told I look a bit younger than I am, so this has also been a barrier. Trying to balance a family and a young daughter has been so fulfilling but has also been a challenge. I have had to turn down opportunities as it conflicted with my family life, though I do not regret it, other opportunities that were more appropriate came along.

What are 3 things you have achieved in your field that you are proud of?

  1. Designing, leading, and teaching the first online Health Policy Course to MPH students at the College of Medical and Allied Health Sciences in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
  2. Developing health and sanitation courses for 300 youth in Kabala, Sierra Leone
  3. Leading alongside my amazing colleagues an adult immunisation campaign across New York City, during this campaign we partnered with 100 organisations and educated the providers about the importance of adult vaccines.

What advise can you provide to other women who want to go into health consultancy?

You will receive a lot of no’s before you receive a yes. I would also advise to be very flexible, early on I had to take on unpaid or very low paying opportunities to build my portfolio, you must use these opportunities to advance your experience and to build contacts as well as to network. Finally, do not get in this field for the money, it is a field that can be riveting, emotional, draining, but very fulfilling, you must get in this field because you want to see change. For the Women|Change|Africa Bosschiques Build Program in Collaboration with WCA Creatives & Nadia Marie &Co
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