3 tips on how to beat procrastination as a freelancer Click To Tweet

Once in a while, a freelancer finds herself under the obligation of completing contracts for a period of months. Usually, emotions go from really excited (about that money of course) to interesting, to daunting and finally, to lethargic.

As is human nature, procrastination creeps in, like a thief in the night. (Okay, that last bit was too much, but you get the point). So, below are tips on how to crush your contractual freelancing gig like a #MotherlandMogul.

Bullet journals

Yes, I know, journaling is a task on its own, but bullet journaling helps greatly when it comes to actually doing your job. It basically consists of to-do lists organised on a daily basis. All you need to do is tick off each item on the list at the end of each day.

This helps you cover every detail on the job. It also forces you to think about the development process of the task ahead. Think I am kidding? This is one of the most agreed upon activities to increase productivity.

Set an agreed time to update your client

Usually, a client that has no time during the entire contract, or one that has no idea of what is required, will start pushing you around at the last minute. They will then get to asking the most ridiculous questions, which can turn into a circus, to put it gently. We also cannot fail to discuss a particular nagging client that lives to terrorise your sleep, and operates in opposite time zones.

For such clients, it is necessary that you provide updates as regularly as possible. Agree upon a date that works for both of you. This way, if you go off-track from the results expected, your client can easily guide you to what is required.

Contractual jobs in freelancing should not cause chaos, handle them by managing your time & client Click To Tweet

Money upfront

Usually, you will not miss a particular client that will ask that you complete a portion of the work without pay ‘just to see how you would fare’. What happens is that such a client will take your work, approach another freelancer, and go ahead and ask her to ‘show him/her what they can do’ without pay as well.

If such a client approaches you, provide a sample of previously done work that is similar to what is required. Always agree on being paid a portion of money before you start off. Alternatively, have a third party withhold the money until various obligations are met.

Other than managing your time and client, contractual jobs in freelancing should not cause chaos. These are actually some of the most envied jobs in the freelancing world so, eat your cake Mogul.

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