9 reasons you should (seriously) consider an internship

Internship

I started giving proper thought to my career during my second year at university. The buzz towards the end of that period was crazy, and getting an internship was all everyone seemed to talk about. The energy was amazing; everybody wanted to get into big firms, especially the investment banks. I would be having lunch, walking along the corridors, working in the computer labs and it was the same – Goldman Sachs this, JP Morgan that, Morgan Stanley, Credit Suisse, Merrill Lynch, Barclays Capital, Deutsche Bank, BNP Paribas…my head almost exploded at a point because that’s all I would hear about.

I wasn’t particularly bothered about getting an internship because I had gained a considerable amount of part-time work experience up until that time, and I had a very well paying summer job coming up at Edexcel (now Pearson UK). I had really enjoyed doing the job the previous summer because of the large number of Nigerian students working there. It was serious fun and there must have been at least 100 of us young Nigerians working there at some point.

Anyway, a great friend and classmate of mine, Chitra, asked me if I had applied to any of the investment banks. I said, “Nope, Edexcel pays very well and I enjoy the work.” She must have thought I was crazy, because she gave me an, ‘Are you ok? Can’t you see what your mates are doing?’ look.

She managed to convince me to put in at least ONE application. I procrastinated for a few days before deciding to check the websites. Lo and behold, I was too late – I had missed all the application deadlines (or so I thought).

I didn’t even feel bad, thinking ‘it wasn’t meant to be’. It must have been a few days later when she asked, “Did you check the Credit Suisse website?” I was like “Errr”…Anyway she told me it was still open and that the deadline was that day. I was like “Today? How am I supposed to get it done in a few hours?” Long story short, I dropped everything else, put in my application and forgot about it. I was convinced they wouldn’t call me because of how I rushed to get it done.

Imagine my surprise when I got called for a telephone interview – I couldn’t believe it. I passed the phone interview, and was invited to attend a 9-hour assessment centre (story for another day). I somehow managed to make it through that successfully, and the rest, as they say, is history.

It was an A M A Z I N G experience. I got to meet and learn from so many brilliant people and was especially fortunate to have a great boss who helped me gain clarity with regards to a decision I had been struggling with for a while, like whether or not to do a master’s degree – I ended up not doing it).

Best of all, though, was the lunch. They had ALL sorts in there, Italian, Indian, Chinese – you name it. Even the dessert was nice. I always looked forward to lunch because of the many different options.

Anyway, let me get down to the real reason I wrote this post. What competitive advantage did my 3 months at Credit Suisse give me? Why should YOU intern?

Internships are one of the best ways to get your foot in the door in terms of getting a full time role. Work hard while you’re there, and there’s a good chance you’ll be asked back. I was made a full time offer for a graduate position immediately after my internship and this meant I didn’t have to worry about applying for jobs in my final year.

Upgrade your CV

Even if you’re not made an offer where you interned, the experience will seriously boost your CV and increase your chances of getting a job elsewhere.

Test drive a career path you’re interested in

I was bent on getting into the telecoms industry after graduation because I enjoyed all the telecoms modules I took as an undergrad. I’m glad I got a chance to intern because my experience at Credit Suisse was a key turning point in terms of helping me discover what I really enjoy doing. (I eventually did my NYSC at a telecoms company and I absolutely hated it).

Develop key transferable skills

An internship is a great opportunity to hone your existing skills and develop new ones, which employers are always looking out for when recruiting.

Learn the importance of work ethic

The workplace is very different from the school environment and the best way to learn work etiquette is in a real life work environment.

Build your network

You get to meet new people and build relationships you can leverage. ALL the jobs I’ve had since NYSC (and I mean ALL 5 jobs since 2009) have been through the network I’ve built over time.

Get professional training

I was ‘trained professionally’ for the first time during my internship. It was the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) training and must have been worth around $150 at the time. Not only did I get it free, I learnt some concepts that I still use today.

Earn a salary

While some internships are unpaid, mine was very well paid and I remember thinking ‘WOW’. It gave me an idea of what I could possibly earn as a full time graduate trainee. Besides, who (especially as a student) doesn’t like some extra cash? 😀

Boost your confidence

The experience seriously boosted my confidence because I had to hit the ground running in terms of the tasks I was assigned. I also had to learn and apply new concepts very quickly in a ‘real-life’ setting. This made me feel like I could achieve anything I set my mind to.

So, what’s holding you back from an internship? I hear many young job seekers complaining about the lack of opportunities in terms of jobs out there and while this is true, there are many ways you can help yourself get a few steps ahead and an internship is one of them.

There’s an absolutely amazing website called Stutern (by Jobberman) that you can use to find out about and apply for internships in Nigeria – I seriously suggest you check it out and apply for any opportunities that interest you.

Get these four mentoring elements right & reap the rewards

lucy quist

‘Get yourself a mentor!’ I bet most of you have heard this sentiment shared at one point or another during trying times in business or career. What always amazes me is the matter-of-fact way this is normally mentioned. When you get a chance to probe what precisely a mentoring relationship ought to look like, don’t be surprised to get a pair or two of blank stares. That’s the nature of buzzwords. Everyone throws them about but very few understand the process that one must follow to ensure a worthwhile mentoring relationship.

When I started my business, I was told at the first business incubation meeting that no business succeeds without mentors. I bought into this; after all business advisors who have been in the game for some time said it. What they failed to mention though is the importance of structuring the relationship in a business-like manner to make it mutually responsive for both parties. ‘If it is not structured, it’s not going to work.’

Before we get some structure, let’s define what mentorship is. In its simplest form, mentorship is a relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps to guide a less experienced or less knowledgeable one. With this knowledge in mind, I went looking for a mentor and my criterion was simple: ‘experienced business owner who has made strides in the business world’. But guess what? The relationship never took off and I found it a tad bit contrived.

Over the duration of my business, I have formed relationships with various mentors; some time-bound, others more regular and yet others sporadic based on need. I have also taken on mentees; some didn’t work out while others flourished. I have settled that structure makes or breaks a mentor/mentee relationship.

Structure has been credited for the turnaround of Ford Motor Company when Allan Mulally, the former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) saved the company from bankruptcy. A structured approach to any intervention necessitates forward thinking. Without it, one is stuck in thinking in the now. Structure implies commitment and precision. And it is these two attributes that I found lacking in my previous relationships. I have, to my great dismay, found that lack of structure tends to be the norm in such relationships. Over the last two years, I have learnt that for a mentoring relationship to succeed, four elements need to be present.

1. Approach your potential mentor thoughtfully

Check the mentors’ track record with prior mentees to ensure that they have added value to others.

It also helps to have a specific request to approach them on and go there with a proposal on how you as the mentee hope to work with the mentor.

2. Have an agreement in place

For some reason we think it’s okay to have written agreements for all other interventions but not for mentoring, which is why, in my opinion, these relationships do not work to their full potential. You need clear guidelines on time, boundaries and work plans.

I have found that when you have it documented, both parties are held accountable to keep their end of the bargain. Most importantly, this enables you (and the mentor) to review the relationship periodically.

3. Understand your mentor beyond the surface

Just as we are always advised to understand what makes our bosses tick, the same principle applies to mentors. Know what works best with them; do they prefer email communication, are they best called in the morning etc?

Know what is important to them and how having you as a mentee is an added value to them.

4. You want the relationship, take charge of it

The assumption is you wanted to have a mentor for a specific reason to ensure that you fulfill your goal. Doing so, requires you take control of the relationship.

The mentor will not run after you, you need to do the running (until you’ve proven your value). Being timid will not get you anywhere neither will aggression. The trick is in striking a healthy balance.

When you approach a mentoring relationship in the same structured way you would coaching or training, you force yourself and your mentor to put priority to the union. When your needs are clear, the mentor knows exactly how they can support you.

The best part is both parties are accountable to each other, and with accountability comes measurement of impact and that is golden!

Yasmin Says: Mastering the art of the email follow up

She Hive Lagos Participant on Email

 

At the end of a networking event or conference, you may end up with dozens of business cards in your portfolio or your purse. While getting the initial card is definitely important, it’s even more important to master the art of the email follow up.

First things first: a few days after the conference, send a brief follow up email to everyone you met. Don’t wait too long or the conversation you had will no longer be relevant in their mind.

1. Have a clear subject line like “Follow up from XYZ Conference” so they don’t assume you’re sending spam since they’re unlikely to recognize your name.

2. Don’t assume they’ll remember exactly who you are since they probably met a bunch of people at the conference. So include subtle hints that will juggle their memory. Here’s an example:

Hi Mrs XYZ,

It was so lovely meeting you at XYZ conference and having the opportunity to talk to you about SLA, the organization that I co-founded which supports young African women on their journey towards professional success.

See what I did there? I subtly reminded them who I was by referring to my organization.

3. Don’t get aggressive if they don’t respond. Everyone’s busy and its not their job to help you. If they don’t respond at first, wait a week and then send the exact same email again. If they still don’t respond, wait a month and then send them an update email, sharing some of the progress you’ve made over the past month and then include your request again. IF they still don’t respond, fall back but keep sending them updates on you and your business once a quarter or once every six months.

Everyone likes to be associated with success, so  showing them how well you’re doing may encourage them to respond. I’ve emailed people for over a year before they responded!! Be persistent yet respectful, and keep up with the follow up.

 

Yasmin Says: How to make your network your net worth

She Hive Lagos participants

We’ve all heard the phrase “Your network is your net worth.” And though, it may seem like one of those cheesy phrases that’s only appropriate for fridge door magnets and tacky self-help books, its 100% true. For young entrepreneurs like us, networking is especially important for a couple of reasons:

  • As you grow your network, you’ll hear more and more about interesting and unique opportunities
  • It’s a good opportunity for you to practice your communication skills

There are a number of different ways to network but today, we’re going to focus on how to #WIN at a formal networking event. Formal networking events are tough for us because both Afua and I are true introverts. So, even the thought of having to spend an evening talking to people we don’t know exhausts us. That said, sometimes, it’s got to be done. So, it’s best to be prepared.

Come with a game plan

You’ll never have a chance to speak to everyone, and if you’re able to preview the guest list before hand, come with a clear list of the people you’d like to speak to. If Afua and I are going to a conference, we’ll do more than come up with a target list. We’ll also prioritize the list so we have people who we MUST connect with vs. people who’d be nice to chat to.

Once we have that list, we create a spreadsheet with these key pieces of information.

1. A few points on the person’s background

Knowing a little bit about them will make it easier for you to strike up conversation. I was at a conference two years back and really wanted to meet the CEO of a large African bank. I did a bit of research and found out that he’d given a really interesting talk on Gender Equality. So when I went up to introduce myself to him, I opened with

“Hi Mr. X, my name is Yasmin. I watched your talk at XYZ about gender equality and found it so inspiring.” And on the conversation went.

2. Why we’d like to speak to them

It’s important to be clear (if possible) on why you’d like to talk to someone. It helps you steer the conversation in the right way and tailor your pitch appropriately.

So, if I’d like to speak to someone about being a pitch competition judge, I’ll start off talking about our awesome pitch competition, the other judges we’ve had and how much fun those judges had. If I’m talking to someone about sponsoring our event, I’ll focus more on talking about the SLA community – growing it is. See the difference?

PS: This isn’t being disingenuous. It’s just understanding that people care about different things and so making sure that you’re emphasizing the part of your business that they’re most likely to care about.

Hang out by the food table

If you don’t feel comfortable introducing yourself to people, try hanging out by the food table. Food is always a great conversation starter. If you see someone picking up that lovely mini cupcake you just tried, go up to them and say,

“Those cupcakes are absolutely amazing. You should definitely try one. O … I’m Yasmin by the way. Nice to meet you. What’s your name?”

And voila! You’ve struck up a conversation in a non-awkward and relaxed manner.

Ask questions

Most people think that networking is all trying to impress people with your amazing accomplishments. But it’s just as important to listen to other people and try to learn more about them. Not only is it polite but the more you learn about someone, the more likely you are to find interesting ways that they could be helpful to you and your business.

I was at a conference once and struck up a conversation with a guy who worked in PE – his deals were all Europe-focused so there wasn’t that much in common with SLA. But after chatting for a few minutes, he mentioned that his wife sat on the board of an organization that we’d desperately been trying to reach out to! Now, you see if I’d spent the whole time blabbing to him about myself, I may never have found out about this awesome connection.

Go for the number 2

Here’s a scene I see at networking events all the time. Important woman or man arrives and everyone swarms him/her, jockeying to get a word in, shoving cards in his/her face, begging for his/her card. Important man/woman is overwhelmed, a little uncomfortable and frankly doesn’t see individuals, instead he/she just sees a mass of overly eager faces.

When this happens DO NOT join them. Here’s a little trick I’ve learnt. Look around for the people that this person arrived with. It might be a chief of staff, a PA, a family friend or just a friend. Target that person. Why you ask? Because that person is waaaaay more accessible than important man/woman and yet they have access to important man/woman.

So, connecting with them gives you a good chance of securing a (maybe even private) meeting with important man/ woman in the future. More generally, that person may actually be able to teach you a thing or two. After all smart, successful people tend to surround themselves with other smart, successful people.

So there you have it! A couple of short tips to help you become ace your next networking event.

Networking 101: 5 tips for your next networking event

Networking She Hive Accra

Attending networking events may seem like an intimidating experience. But, it does not have to be, if you prepare in advance and follow the tips below.

1. Arrive on time

This is especially important for networking events with no any speakers or program outline.

beyonce lemonade beyonce lemonade don't hurt yourself

You’ll more time to meet people as they arrive.

2. Name badge to the left

When given a name badge, wear it on your left side so that it does not get crumpled or turned upside down as you shake with your right hand. You’re welcome!

3. Business cards at all times

The most important tip! Having business cards on you is a must when attending networking events. Before you leave the house, repeat this mantra: keys, money, phone, business cards.

You can easily print your own with blank business cards from the office supply store. Be sure it has your current industry or areas of focus on it.

What’s more, you can even use your business cards to jot down the contact details of a person you wish to follow up on.

4. Conversations

To begin, ask them how they are affiliated with the event ?

beyonce interview glasses

Or, how they heard about the event? Make sure they’re open ended, so they’re are forced to make full sentences as opposed to yes or no answers.

5. Stand out

Choose events that will increase your professional network, so attend industry events in your industry or in a field you wish you break into.

beyonce slay formation i slay

If there are speakers are going to be in attendance, look them up online to prepare questions for the question and answer session.

In a more informal setting, you can inquire about the speakers’ professional or educational background. Also note that it is important to highlight things you may have in common: If you attended the same school, or from the same city/state, mention it.

Do your homework, and you’ll have a memorable networking experience.

Building networking relationships that last

I don’t remember ever feeling comfortable in networking situations and when I had to introduce myself to a group of strangers. 

But the thing is, these nerve-wracking conversations could lead to critical personal and professional opportunities. Think about it! You are probably where you are in your career or as an enlightened person due to communal effort. The contribution of those around us in our individual advancement cannot be downplayed.

Your network is your net worth…

And we’re always one or two persons away from getting what we need. All we have to do is reach out to people we know. Mildred Apenyo, an entrepreneur and the founder of FitcliqueAfrica, was able to secure space for her women’s only gym through her network, for example. One of the trainers she worked with connected her to a family that owns a hotel and they agreed to let her turn one of their conference rooms into a fitness space. This saved her a lot of time and the resources that would have gone into searching for a usable space throughout her city.

Whatever you do, don’t network just for the sake of it. Most of us are consumed with attending all the events out there and collecting as many business cards possible. Post ‘networking’ binge, we always find ourselves stuck in a rut, wondering if it was all even worth it. The key is to be deliberate about the events you attend. Show up ready to mingle. Once you get the contact information you need, don’t let it sit there gathering dust. Take action. Remember that networking is a process that requires on to be proactive.

What keeps us from taking action?

The fear of rejection

There’s always a chance that our attempts at fostering relationships will be rejected. It’s only natural for us to avoid instances where rejection is a possibility. The thing about life however, is that nothing is certain, so you might as well try. The worst that could happen is that they’ll say ‘no.’ But remember, with every ‘no’ you are one step closer to a YES!

Being stuck in our comfort zones

Networking takes time, effort, energy and resources – things that a lot of us unfortunately see as ‘doing too much.’ “They have my contact information, if they are interested they will reach out,” we say. “Why should I follow up with an email or a call?” we wonder. We think that just attending the event and putting in face time is enough. It is not, unfortunately. You have to nurture the relationships. Make initial contact, follow up with in-person meetings and grow from there.

Getting things done

As Martha C. White outlines in TIME, it’s increasingly becoming clear that for networking to work, we have to shift from the ‘What’s in it for me?’ mindset. It is imperative to understand that there is a mutual exchange in this process. Networking is not just about accumulating a list of contacts that you can reach out to when the need arises. It is more about building real relationships that involve active participation of give and take between both parties.

Depending on your situation, you need to first identify the people you would like to connect with. It could be someone you want to learn from professionally or an investor who you think might be interested in your business concept. Once the individual has been identified, the first step you take in approaching them could either seal the deal or break it. You might be tempted to bombard them with information about yourself or your potential business, but it is not about you. Remember?

Your first introduction should be about connecting with that person. Show them that you are genuinely interested in what they do and what they have to say. Create an atmosphere that compels them to talk about themselves. Ask thoughtful questions and actively listen to their responses. This will build a good rapport that will seamlessly lead to a conversation about you.

You have connected, what’s next?

At this point, there’s only one thing left. Follow up. Follow up. Follow up! The sooner you hit the ground running, the better. Business etiquette expert Jacqueline Whitmore asserts relationships take time to be built. In order for you to build a strong professional network, mastering the art of the follow up is necessary.

A quick email post the event will do. It doesn’t have to be long but it should contain the fundamentals. Begin by thanking the person for their time. If you had a very nice conversation about a particular topic, this could be the starting point to setting up the next meeting. Apart from that, it is also important to keep in mind a few details about the conversation you had. What were the other parties’ needs and how can you be involved in meeting those. Always seek out ways you can help your new contact without expecting anything in return. The level of trust will build over time if you do this.

Rita Kusi shares 6 tips on how to make your marketing stand out

coke billboard marketing africa

Are you having difficulties marketing and or selling to an African audience? Perhaps you should reevaluate your marketing techniques.

Prior to relocating to Ghana, my way of marketing and working was mainly digital and via online platforms. After relocating, I realized that while these methods were very effective abroad, they were not as effective in reaching a large audience in Ghana. This is probably the case in most African countries. Digital and online marketing, commonly known as Above The Line (ATL) marketing, is a great way to target the urban youth and the global audience.

However, if you want to reach adults and local residents living in rural areas, your best bet is to use effective Below The Line (BTL) marketing techniques, such as, on-the-ground activations and promotions.

In Ghana, ATL marketing is effective because most people are almost always tuned into their local radio or television stations. The use of the internet has only increased recently because of the rising use of mobile technology. As a marketer, you have to know how to adapt to this environment.

The solution is not to give up on the old tactics you know or are familiar with but instead, effectively incorporate new strategies to help you become a well-rounded marketer.

So what characteristics do you need to be a great marketer in the African context? What marketing strategies are effective for engaging the African market? Well, I discuss them below.

Characteristics of a great African marketer

I’ve always considered myself lucky to have the skills of a marketer. At times, I wonder if one is born a marketer or can learn to become a marketer. I believe effective marketers are born with certain traits and also learn as they go. The world is always changing so we must be able to change with the times. Here are 10 characteristics that are time tested to be true of an great African marketer:

  • Have a genuine passion for people
  • Honest, personable and approachable
  • Possess networking skills
  • Embrace and drive change
  • Stay connected to an African audience
  • Communicate effectively
  • Passionate
  • Innovative and thinks outside the box
  • Take chances
  • Wholehearted belief in the product they are selling

Motherland Mogul Tip:Remember, good marketers can market and sell any product, but great marketers choose the products they want to market and sell.

They are persistent and do not understand the word “no”. Good marketers are led by passion and the need to connect the right people to the right product. They understand their target demographic and will go to great lengths to connect them to that product. Next, we discuss strategies for marking effectively in the African context.

Strategies for marketing effectively in the African market

Now, with these characteristics, you must be willing to do some things differently to gain traction in the African market. Let’s discuss a few strategies below.

1. Establish strong genuine relationships

Often many of us like to take the conventional networking approach. I’ve been guilty of this in the past. We attend an event, meet someone and have a two-minute conversation then request for a business card.

Effective marketers actually take the time to follow up and establish rapport with potential clients, sponsors, partners, and their audience. In Ghana, it is all about who you know. Therefore, establishing relationships is crucial to your success in almost any field.

2. Sustain relationships

One of the most important lessons I have learned is that it is not enough to establish relationships with people. Sustaining those relationships plays a crucial role in the success of your marketing strategies. It is one thing to establish relationships but what are you doing to sustain them?

Sustaining relationships are one of the hardest and most challenging things to do because it requires time. It is none the less a great investment. An occasional phone call, email, or visit helps you to stay connected.

3. Form strategic alliances/partnerships

It is a fact that we all need someone and cannot get to where we are going alone. Form strategic partnerships that are mutually beneficial. Align yourself with people who have a similar mission and your best interest at heart. They will help you sell or market your product.

In Ghana, having notable sponsors and partners as part of your event validates your event somehow. Rarely do you see fliers or posters without sponsors. However, you want to be strategic in forming these alliances and not overdo it.

4. Networkability

Word-of-mouth continues to be the #1 effective way of marketing. As a marketer, it is your responsibility to go out and network constantly. Whether your goal is to increase your clientele or fan base, go out there and meet the right people who will help get you to your goal.

True marketers understand that time is of the essence. There is no need speaking with everyone in the room, just key people who you share commonalities and a similar vision.

5. Communicate effectively and believe in the product

As a marketer your verbal and written communication must be up to par. You have to believe in what you are selling in order for people to believe in it as well.

Therefore, your way of communicating must be clear, concise, convincing, and easily understood.

6. Think marketing

True marketers are always thinking about marketing. They apply marketing to almost any and everything around them.

To conclude, marketing in Africa is very different from marketing in the States or elsewhere outside of the continent. Sitting behind your PC expecting to reach a large number of consumers is not ideal. Bottom Line Marketing is king! You must be willing to go out and connect with people.

5 ways to upgrade your LinkedIn profile

Improve your LinkedIn profile in just one

Your LinkedIn profile is your introduction to the professional world. It is just as important as your resume/CV. However, the two are different. If your LinkedIn profile is an exact copy of your resume/CV then you are doing it wrong.

LinkedIn provides users with a platform where then can include more aspects in their profile than they can fit in a standard resume/CV. Use that to your advantage. Think of it as a marketing tool.

Remember that recruiters are now using LinkedIn to not only vet job applicants before an interview, but also to find and contact potential candidates.

Wondering how to upgrade your profile? Here are 5 ways you can do it:

1. Get a great headshot

Yes, it is necessary! No one wants to click on a profile without a picture. You want your profile to get the attention it deserves so upload a photo. Not just any photo either. That means no selfies, group photos or pictures of you turning up.

Put up a high-resolution picture of yourself without anything distracting in the background. Dress appropriately and smile. You want the picture to exude confidence and happiness.

Read more here: 3 Ways To Transform Your LinkedIn Profile From Crappy to Fabulous

2. Add a creative headline

The headline is one of the first things that people looking at your profile will see. It should grab their attention and compel them to read on. Think about your next career step.

Where do you see yourself? What kind of opportunities do you want to explore? Use this to inform how you craft your headline. Incorporate keywords and structure it in a way that it shows exactly who you want to be.

 Think of your LinkedIn headline as a condensed mission statement. 

3. Write a concise summary

A well-written summary will help recruiters and potential partners find you. Make it personal. Share your passion about the industry you are in or are looking to transition to.

What is your background? What have you achieved so far? What are your career goals? Use keywords and weave your responses into a career story that will give recruiters insight into who you are, and make them want to meet you.

Read more here: Three Steps To Writing The Perfect LinkedIn Summary

4. Add media

LinkedIn allows users to incorporate media to their experience section. It’s a great way for people to get a sense of what you have done.

Have a presentation, video, photo or document that you worked on? Upload it. Is your work online? Link to it. Add media that you are proud of and that showcases the range of your abilities.

Take advantage of the media add-ons on LinkedIn to SHOW people exactly what you are capable of.

5. Skills and endorsements

Be strategic about the skills that you list. Limit them to the ones you are most confident in and that you want to be known for.

Endorse your colleagues’ skills. Chances are they will do the same for you. Endorsements show that you have the skills and expertise that you say do.

Have you tried any of these tips? Were they helpful? Any others I didn’t mention? Go ahead and share them with me below.

Social Media Week Lagos 2016

Social Media Week Lagos event

Join She Leads Africa and Facebook during Social Media Week Lagos 2016 for The Internet of Me Masterclass – Making Connections, Building Community & Sharing Your Voice.

The Internet of Me Masterclass will teach participants how they can utilize social media to become influencers and leaders on the important issues they care about. She Leads Africa will be our case study in how to develop a concept, use social media tools and online networking to get the word out and use your fans as brand ambassadors.

We will also share examples from our community members who have reached specific business goals via social media engagement. This class is for anyone (female or male) that wants to harness social media and various tech platforms to create a community that generates impact for your business or career.

  • Participants will leave with a toolkit of 15 strategies they can immediately implement to grow their social influence and make connections based on SLA research and surveys
  • Participants will have greater awareness of tactics they can use to increase their Facebook, Instagram and Twitter engagement
  • Participants will be able to network with fellow young professionals and make valuable business connections during the event

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Register to attend here: Social Media Week Lagos