The Millionaire Housewife’s rules for every side hustler

Whether you are looking to make some extra income or start a business while working, side hustling is no small feat. You must learn to balance your commitments, stay consistent and grow while you’re at it.

Temi Ajibewa, founder of The Millionaire Housewife Academy – an online platform that has helped over 5,000 women start their online businesses, shares her golden rules for side hustle success.


Rule 1: Discover Your Passion

Your passion could be an issue you feel strongly about or something you do effortlessly.

Side hustles based on passion tend to be more sustainable because you are self-motivated to go on even when things get tough.

If you are not sure what your passion is, here are 3 ways to get started:

  1. Look out for things you do well without incentives and recognition.
  2. Ask people who know you what they think you are passionate about.
  3. Consider problems people often ask you to solve because you find them easy to solve.

Rule 2: Turn Your Passion into Profit

Doing what you are passionate about is one thing. Knowing how to make money from your passion is a whole different ball game.

Here are 5 basic steps I teach my clients to monetize their passion.

1. Find the problem your passion solves

Your passion cannot bring you money unless it solves a specific human problem.

People may not pay you to get into heaven, but they will pay you to get out of hell – @temi_ajibewa Click To Tweet

For you to monetize your passion, you have to discover the hell your passion can get people out of. If you cannot find a hell, you might not have a monetizable passion. It is best as a hobby.

2. Find your money tribe

The next step to monetizing your passion is finding people who are willing and able to spend money on solutions to their problems. These people are your money tribe.

If you are not sure how to identify your money tribe, ask yourself this question – If I throw a concert, who will be first in line for tickets?

3. Turn your passion into a skill

To have a passion valued by other people, you must be able to do it competitively well. When this happens, your passion becomes a skill.

You can prune your passion by volunteering, learning through a mentor or taking online classes.

4. Create a product from your passion

Your passion must become a product or service for you to make money from it.

A great way to turn your passion into a product is by teaching people what you know for a fee. When I started to monetize The Millionaire Housewife Academy, I created e-books, DVDs and online classes to teach people what I knew about starting and growing an online business.

I always recommend starting off with digital products because they are easier to maintain and become lifelong assets people all over the world can buy.

People pay for products and services, not passions.

5. Promote your hustle

You must shamelessly promote your passion if you want to make money from it. 

You can’t afford to be shy if you want your passion to be more than a hobby. If you are nervous, start off by promoting your hustle to people in your network.


Price is only an issue where value is in dispute. Once people realize the value they’re getting from you, paying you becomes non-negotiable. It all starts with finding and monetizing your passion.

Learn more about how to start a successful online side hustle at The Millionaire Housewife Academy.

Living Life with a Full-Time Job and multiple Side Gigs: 4 Commandments to adopt

6 months ago, I decided I needed to get a day job. The decision came after I had run my fashion design business and realized I needed firsthand experience running the kind of business I wanted. I got a job as a Personal Assistant in a big manufacturing company. The role is combined with several other unofficial roles. 6 months down the line, I can safely say I am not so over my head as was 2 months ago. Between this full-time job, running my fashion design business on a small scale and freelance writing, it is safe to say I had no “me” time. I had no life outside of work. I had finally done two things I dreaded: living for the weekend and working hard without being productive. Two months ago, I told myself that this had to stop. I finally came up with a routine that helped me do all I wanted realistically and still have a life. Here are my four quick tips for having a life with a full job and side gigs. Balancing two or more responsibilities with self-care is hard but not impossible. Here are the 4 commandments to follow: Click To Tweet

1. Thou shall keep a To-Do list and use it.

I found out that having a to-do list keeps me organized. With so much to do at work and in my side jobs, I find myself running around a lot and doing nothing much. My daily To-do list is organized the night before. I factor prayer, working out, my main job, my writing, my sewing in the evening into the list. I make sure I leave blocks of time to accommodate the unforeseen jobs that will come up at work. This is a daily occurrence. The To-Do list increased my productivity by 50%.

2. Thou shall set realistic targets

3 months into the job I developed stress belly and added weight. My face broke out and I started to wear wigs, leaving my natural hair matted under the wigs. Forget mani-pedi.  That was gone. When I took the decision to get my life together, the first thing I did was set goals. Safe to say the targets were pretty high and I gave up. I went back to the board and re-drew the plan. Work out thrice a week as opposed to every day. Drink water, get my nails done bi-monthly. Braid my hair once a month and wear wigs for the other days of the month. 2 months in, my stress belly has reduced and I still maintain my hair and nails routine.

3. Thou shall factor in “You” time

I love going to the movies, green tea, and red wines. One of the first things I stopped doing was going to the movies. Weekends were tight. No more tea time and wine time. I now find time on Sundays to savor a cup of tea or a glass of wine. Most importantly I fix movie dates so I will have to make time for them. This means I must close out official work by Friday and put extra time into the writing.  It is worth it. Relate each work experience to your business. This way your work and life is balanced emotionally. Click To Tweet

4. Thou shall find a purpose in what you do.

If your job pays a bit low like mine, you might grow resentful over time. This will definitely affect your work-life balance. For someone who wants the experience, this will make a terrible experience. One way I have managed to balance myself emotionally is to relate each work experience to my business. One thing I have learned to do is to be grateful and positive. It gives more light to the work I do. I make the choice to cut back when I can. Balancing two or more responsibilities with self-care is hard but not impossible and we are getting there. Till next time. For now, drink a glass of wine or cradle a cup of tea and take care of you!
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6 Ways to Harness and Monetize your Many Passions

Asides the obvious fact that the recent economic downturn has forced several young people to have multiple sources of income, it is quite the norm these days to meet people who have a full-time job and are running small businesses on the side.

They are also known as “side hustles”, and even full-fledged companies complete with all the bells and whistles.

Sincerely, it is now a reality that a single income cannot sustain a comfortable lifestyle and this has pushed the average young Nigerian to get creative and take a dip in the entrepreneurship pool.

Here are six ways to convert your many interests to money in the bank:

Take on practices that will not only push you out of your comfort zone but also work on improving your weaknesses - @tolanithomas Click To Tweet

Leave your comfort zone

Starting and running a business is not for the fainthearted, it will constantly push you out of your comfort zone.

For example, if you have a fear of speaking to strangers, you will have to overcome that when networking and marketing your services to potential customers.

Take on practices that will not only push you out of your comfort zone but also work on improving your weaknesses. You don’t have to be an expert, just be comfortable enough to deliver value that people want and need.

You need more than passion

It’s great to be passionate about your business ideas, but don’t let your enthusiasm blind you from reality. Be honest with yourself!

Ensure there is a market to tap into and you are ready to put in the work. Get honest feedback from people around you; even friends and family by offering your services to them.

You have to be truly good at what you do. Your passion could be making people’s faces up, but are you skilled enough to train others?

Also bear in mind that as a business owner, you’ll be responsible for reporting taxes, marketing your business and sorting out your finances. Are you ready for all the responsibility?

Offer Real Value

What void can you fill in the market? For example, if you are a makeup artist and there is no makeup studio around you, that could be a viable business opportunity.

The goal is to take advantage of the gaps in the market, that way you stand out and enjoy greater returns before the copycats join you in that space.

Ask yourself how you can make the industry better? Is this the business that keeps your entrepreneurial juices flowing?

Let’s say your passion is making furniture. Why are you better than your competitors? Is it because your materials are sourced locally? Or your products are unique and one of a kind?

That would be more appealing to customers as opposed to buying generic mass-produced furniture.

When I started my consulting company, I had used several competitors. I knew what made them great, but I also knew what I wanted that they didn’t offer.

I knew how to better the services. I started it and here we are!

Six ways to convert your many interests to money in the bank: 1. Leave your comfort zone... Click To Tweet

Convert your Passion to Cash

There are several ways to make money off your passions:

  • Selling an actual product such as clothing, beauty products online or in a store.
  • Sharing your knowledge about your passion by blogging, writing books or making videos. Between sponsorships, subscribers and selling your own products, you can make a decent living. For example, Arese Ugwu turned her passion for financial literacy into a book – The Smart Money Woman – into a book that is being sold in several countries in Africa and the UK.
  • Offering consulting services by giving advice on anything from law to skincare.
  • Investing in an idea you are willing to financially support.
  • Creating a software or gadget that makes life easier for people. For example, if you were a makeup artist, you could create an app that helps people find the right makeup products for their skin tones.
  • Start an event around your passion, such as a regular meetup, seminar or a festival.

Make Fun a Priority

Maintaining your passion when starting a legitimate business can be difficult. Some people even forget exactly why they started a business in the first place.

To prevent that from happening, always make fun and passion a priority. Your passion should reflect on your company policies, your passion should be communicated to your employees when you are hiring and they have to be equally passionate about your business as well.

Don’t wait till you master the craft before you start your business. You can learn as you go - @tolanithomas ‏ Click To Tweet

Improve Your Skills

It would be great if you have a lot of experience, however, don’t be too hard on yourself, there’s always room for growth and learning. For example, a furniture maker may be great are creating unique tables, but not so good at creating sofas.

You can learn as you go along your journey, don’t wait till you master the craft before you start your business.

Malcolm Gladwell says it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert in any field. Nonetheless, don’t let the perceived amount of time it would take you to be the best at what you do deter you from moving ahead with your plan.

It may not take you that long to master your craft, as you long as you keep looking for ways to improve your skills. Always ask for feedback and track your progress.


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Nnanke Essien: The Visibility Expert

Nnanke Essien is a visibility strategist and business transformation coach. She helps individuals with awesome ideas, products and services to get seen and found by their ideal clients.

She does this using a 5 step visibility building process to build an effective and efficient visibility roadmap. Nnanke believes that the path to success is littered with awesome but poorly marketed ideas, hence her mandate is to support businesses find this sure pathway.

She is a John Maxwell Certified coach, a HR professional and a visibility builder round the clock. She has been supporting start-ups and businesses since 2007 even through college.


Why is it important to stay visible?

If nobody knows you exist, nobody will buy from you. It’s really that simple, you must always find a way for your ideal clients to remember that you exist. We call it top of mind awareness. In other words, if at any point your client has a need, your brand name should be top of mind.

How can brands stay visible despite strong competition on social media? 

Truthfully, social media isn’t going anywhere and the earlier business owners understand this and take ownership the better for brands. Firstly, to stay visible, brands must adhere to a stellar mindset.

Beyond this, brands need clarity on why they are in the business. This is in terms of the business mission, vision, values, identifying their business playing field (niche), their core message and their brand positioning on the value chain.

Brands also need clarity on their ideal clients. Who are the people whose lives and businesses will be transformed by virtue of the fact that this business exists?

Understanding the client’s exact needs, desires, challenges, what they need to transform, lifestyle, spending power and motivation is key to business visibility success.Finally, brands can also stay visible by authenticating their authority in the market. Having consistent, attractive and meaningful bio’s on their social media platforms can contribute to this. Their bio must contain relevant information on who the brand is.

Also, nurturing communities i.e groups, leveraging on content and becoming an information reservoir for clients can be a great way of authenticating authority. In all of these, consistency and building revenue generating models, systems, processes and assets are key to success and visibility.

What are your top three tips for business owners to incorporate into their brands?

  1. Have a consistent brand voice and visual appeal that is easy for people to spot and recognize.
  2. Focus on building relationships using KLT (Know, Like and Trust) techniques like live videos, Instagram stories, guest appearances et al.
  3. Leverage on content that your ideal clients need.

How can women balance putting themselves out there while not appearing too forward?

Woman know what you want. Don’t do things out of compulsion or pressure. The woman you buy shoes from didn’t shy away from her calling, the woman who sells human hair didn’t shy away from her calling.
Recognize your hustle. Validate it! Look for a group of persons or coaches and mentors who can help you identify your hustle, find your sweet spot, stay there, flaunt it and own it.

What do you wish more entrepreneurs knew about today’s changing marketplace?

I wish they would spend more time actually researching than copying and wasting endless time doing idle and non-income generating activities. Behaviors are changing. The spending power of your ideal clients is changing. Algorithms on all the social platforms you are using are changing.

What is the next step for you in 2018?

I want to have intentional positioning. This will include focussing on my visibility cure show and collaborating with industry veterans.

Chantal Fraser: When I switched careers, I began looking at design as more than just a hobby

Chantal Fraser is a fashion designer and house singer based in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.  She started her fashion label Chante Clothing in 2010 as a side hustle and transitioned it to full time in 2014.

Her clients comprise of everyone from local celebrities, to brides and bridesmaids and any young lady wanting to look chic and well put together.

Chantal also works with locally based international brands like Edgars which is part of the Woolworths Group of companies.

Following the family tradition, Chantal finally decided to venture into music in 2017 and released her single Better than Yesterday. 


When did you fall in love with fashion?

I’ve always had a passion for it since I was young – like seriously young. My passion started with creating beadwork and eventually sketching fashion ideas. 

What gave you the courage to pursue Chante Clothing full time?

Passion full stop! My passion was burning so much that I just could not ignore it. I was miserable, working and doing other things. Even though I was getting paid well, I just didn’t have the passion. 

I said to myself, if others can dive into their passions and do it, why can’t I?

What setbacks did you have during that transition period?

Definitely, finances.  I was jumping into an unknown business. Yes, I had passion but obviously, I was still trying to weave my way through it.

In addition, I had to patiently grow my clientele which took a lot longer than I anticipated. When people are committed to their designer you know that’s it. It is hard to convince them to try someone new.

Before setting up Chante Clothing, what were you doing and how did it help you later on?

I was doing accounts. I hated it! But for some reason, I’d find myself doing accounts in jobs. But when I did switch careers, I began looking at design as more than just a hobby – but a legitimate way of making an income. This made establishing the business easier.

Do you feel like there are enough structures that help women build a business?

Yes and no. There is still a mindset that it depends on what the trade is. Some people don’t look at design as a business; they still see it as a plaything. But if there are women seeking financial assistance for something like chickens they are able to source funds much easier than us. I believe that there is a bias against fashion to some extent. 

Have you had any mentors help you in your entrepreneurial journey?

Yes, I have. I’m privileged to know loads of people in the same business as me. My fiancé has been in the fashion industry much longer than I have. Since we collaborated on C and C Clothing, I have been able to learn a lot from him and his support.

I also have friends who helped me learn to sew. While I did have the passion, I needed to acquire the skill. This led me to camp at a friend’s house and eventually learn how to sew. I really appreciate her for doing that for me.

What has opening a business taught you about yourself?

It’s taught me that I can have discipline when it comes to money lol. Initially, I didn’t think I would be this disciplined, but opening a business had really exposed me to some of my strengths.

Fashion fades but style never fades - @chanteclothing Click To Tweet

What do you want Chante Clothing to represent as a brand?

I want it to represent elegance and style. 

It’s about bringing out the inner you. It’s about genuinely feeling confident and beautiful and not conforming to what people say is the latest trend. That’s what my business is all about!

Who are your style or fashion icons?

I really like David Tlale and his tenacity. Dolce and Gabbana are also inspiring as they are a team like my fiancé and I. We look up to them. If they can do it, so can we!

You currently have a single out, Better Than Yesterday. How did you get into singing and why a motivational track specifically?

My parents are actually musicians, they had a band ages ago. I didn’t choose music, music chose me! It was in the blood!

I’ve always had the passion and have been singing from forever. When I released my track, I chose motivational music because there’s a world out there that is extremely confused. A lot of people do not know who they are really.

If media says this is the style everyone moves to that. No one has a backbone to stand on. So, with my motivational music, I hope to inspire people to be who they are no matter what situations they are going through.  

The themes vary but basically, it’s about you being you being proud of who you are! 

So where did you get your obviously innate sense of confidence?

I think I got it from my parents (Not I think, I know!) and especially my mum. She was a very bold person and I learnt a lot from her.

I was fortunate to have parents that allowed us to be who we wanted to be. No matter what you wanted to do they supported you all the way.

What advice can you give about being true to yourself and following your dreams?

Every child is born with a dream, and as time goes on, people that surround you can slowly discourage you.

Don’t forget what that first love was. Go back to it and don’t allow anyone to stand in your way. Even if it seems hard just keep going, keep at it because at the end of the day, that’s what you were born to do.

There’s nothing as depressing as doing something because it’s a trend or because family is pressuring you.  Misery is the most disheartening thing ever. Indulge your passion and you’ll get there eventually.

How do balance two careers (and a personal life!)?

It can get difficult at times. What I’ve learnt to do especially with two careers is put timelines and plan to do specific things within certain time frames. Planning is essential.

I go as far as saying when I get home, there will be no work talk but it can definitely get hectic.

What does success look like to you at the end? How will you know you have achieved your dreams?

Success is when I can look back at my life and say well-done Chanty and I’m happy and I have tried everything. If you haven’t tried it all how would you look back and truly be satisfied?

That’s where I find success even in failure. Failures can be a success because you made the effort. You don’t want to have a what if in your mind. What ifs are horrible!  

Success should be about inner satisfaction and being happy. It’s not something that can be equated to a particular amount of money or how many likes you get on Facebook or how many people follow you on Instagram. It’s about self-contentment and being able to say at the end of it I tried it all.


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Wana Udobang’s guide to balancing side and main hustles

Wana Udobang
Working in full-time employment helped in many ways - @MissWanaWana Click To Tweet

Wana Udobang is a producer and director of the documentaries; “Sensitive Skin” a documentary film about the skin condition Psoriasis; “Nylon” a short documentary on memory, trauma, and loss; and the documentaries-series “Warriors” exploring the lives of people with sickle cell disease. She also is the creator of the poetry series “Words and Inspirations” and the interview series “Culture Diaries”. Wana wrote and directed the web series “Room313” and the short film “Shrink”. She plays Visha in the award winning Burkinabe film “Frontiéres”.

Wana has worked with the BBC Radio4, BBC world service, 92.3 Inspiration FM and Resonance FM. Her work has appeared on Aljazeera, Guardian UK, Guardian Nigeria, Index on Censorship, and Brittle Paper. She graduated from the University for The Creative Arts with a first class degree in Journalism. Wana is creative director of WanaWana productions and hosts the television show Airtel Touching Lives.

Interested to know how this media lady keeps all her creative work in equilibrium, SLA contributor Anuli interviewed Wana for some insider tips.


I don’t think I ever saw myself as a celebrity and I still don’t. I have always focused on the work and that is what I continue to do Click To Tweet

Tell us how your journey began?

I wrote poetry as a teenager. It became a source of catharsis for me. I studied journalism at university and I always enjoyed cinema and documentary so I decided to try my hand at it as opposed to talking about it so much

You have been in employment before launching out to create your own niche. Would you say employment helped hone some, if not most of your skills?

Working in full-time employment helped in many ways. Whether it was pitching ideas or having a 360 view of how the media worked and of course the general discipline of managing your time.

On Air Personalities (OAP) in Nigeria are seen or celebrated as celebrities. How do you keep evolving and stay relevant?

I don’t think I ever saw myself as a celebrity and I still don’t. I have always focused on the work and that is what I continue to do. Make sure that my work is getting better, I learn more interesting ways to engage and connect with audiences but I think what drives me stays the same. Which is how I can tell powerful and meaningful stories that can make an impact.

While working as an OAP on Inspiration FM, where you also doing other gigs? Please tell us what they are.

I was mostly writing and performing poetry. So I was a columnist at NEXT newspapers, wrote for Bella Naija and other platforms. I was also hosting events and moderating panels and discussions at conferences.

Also, I worked with brands on marketing campaigns as an influencer. I did a bit of TV presenting but none of it was a conflict of interest to my full-time job

You currently host Airtel Touching Lives. Were you holding down a day job when this opportunity came? What would you say was the x-factor that made you the preferred choice to host this show?

Yes, I still worked on the radio whilst I shot both the first and second season. I really can’t tell you if there was anything special but I hope that my genuine interest, commitment and need to connect came through and fingers crossed that was something that stood out

So which of your roles or jobs would you say are main and side hustles?

I think hosting events are a side hustle but everything else is part and parcel of my career. I think when you see things as a side hustle then they become that.

I think when you see things as a side hustle then they become that - @MissWanaWana Click To Tweet

How do you give your all to your hustles and still deliver top quality work?

I don’t really approach anything as important from the other. I see it all as one entity with myself as project manager. This for me means that adequate planning, time management with expectations and deliverables go into everything that I do.

You just aired a Youtube Series called Warriors. Before that, you aired Culture Diaries and Room 313. Tell us about any challenges or obstacles in shooting these series and how you overcame them, please?

Money is the main obstacle. These projects have all been self-funded which means a lot of the time, you are pulling in favours so you have to work around other people’s time as they are helping you out. So you don’t have as much control as you would like because you are working around other people’s schedules and dependent on their goodwill.

Now, let’s talk finance. How have you been able to get your work (side and main hustles) out to the world without going bankrupt?

I really take advantage of the internet and social media. It has been quite revolutionary in helping to not just share my work but in building a community and audience for the work. And most of that takes my work than money. I literally live online.

Please share 3 quick rules in ensuring one stays on top of their hustles

I would say

  • Planning,
  • Time Management and
  • Create value (be the best at it)

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Master the art of the side hustle in school

If you are an active person in school you probably have 2-3 things going on at the same time Click To Tweet

In university, it becomes important to effectively balance the primary purpose of being on campus (school) with every (and I mean every) other activity you have going on.

From my first year in school, I was always involved in multiple activities. I worked at the school’s radio as an OAP, I worked as an event host within and outside the school and the state. I worked with several magazines, writing for them, raising funds, planning events etc. I had obligations in church…phew!

In my final year, there was the main school project, several committees, freelance writing jobs, a sewing and a buying and selling business, a costume creative group, and of course church.

For a student, this is equivalent to having side jobs and a main job. In this case, the main job is school and that is your starting point. How do you juggle all of this?

1. Your primary focus will determine the spare time you have

Like it or not, love the school (course) or not, you are bound by your academic schedule. That is your 9-5. (Or 6.30-5 in some cases ).

When you have your school schedule (timetable ) down to a pat, then you can begin to fix other pieces in place.

2. Work smart,not hard.

Cliché but true. And no, I am not advocating for class skipping. It will go a long way to help balance your multitasking if you quickly figure out which classes are necessary, important, compulsory and useful.

I have seen students wait around for the next class, staying on in spite of there being no classes. They just hang around. Except when you are networking or gathering information, you don’t have that luxury.

3. Every second of the day counts.

Tick tock.

You work with time. 30 minutes is ample time to fix one or two things within a given period. You might end up wasting time if you have no idea how to effectively use the free moments you have.

4. Know those who can help you ease your burden.

In this case, the “who” will be your class representative. A cordial relationship with your class representative puts you in a position of information.

A typical day for me starts the night before. I call my class representative to ask for shifting class schedules, classes most likely not to hold, vital information and anything that will save me from making an unnecessary trip inside school.

A good school squad (if your squad is not in your class), is needed to cover up lapses in the case you get stuck conducting other business. They are your support team.

5. Follow a daily plan

My planning culture from school has helped me till this moment. I make a weekly plan, a very big one. It is colour coded to accommodate classes, meetings, jobs, church obligations, business and whatever I might have going on, including fun time (totally needed). Then I break them into smaller blocks by the days.

I then proceed to pen into my mini planner (small enough to fit into an average clutch purse) the activities that are high on the priority list outside school, because that is a constant. The list in my mini planner are the things I must complete. These are the jobs, clothes to sew, meetings, assignments, etc. You consult this planner like an Oracle on an hourly basis. Ticking off one completed task after the other can be fulfilling.

Finally getting yourself into a good head space each morning will go a long way to prepare you for your almost topsy-turvy day. Personally, for me to start a productive day, I need the following; prayer, exercise, a glass of water and a good breakfast.

NB: Priscilla’s all important bag contents for a work day

1. A tote bag (to carry everything!)

2. Bottled water

3. A fruit/chocolate bar

4. Bubblegum

5.Sunglasses

6. Slippers (for when I wear heels or loafers)

7. My planner

8. Any work related items

9. Earphones

10. Hand lotion

11. Lip gloss

12. Wipes and mini tissues

13. Pens

14. A cabman. He won’t fit into a bag but is necessary for mobility.

Financial affairs in freelancing

Like any business, freelancing has its peak seasons and its low seasons. Know them Click To Tweet

So, you delved into freelancing. You jumped head first (or first dipped your toes, whichever works for you) into being your own boss and now nothing can stop you from working in your pyjamas. First of all, big hearty congratulations.

Not many make it past opening a freelancing account somewhere, let alone enlist clients. And now that we have gotten the pleasantries out of the way, let us get into the nitty gritty. The big girl stuff. Mogul business.

It is essential that you realise that like any business out there, freelancing has its peak seasons and its really, and I mean, really low seasons. This being said, it is essential that finances line up throughout these seasons. Let’s get to it.

Know your market

This is the basis of any business, and it applies even in online businesses. Knowing when the seasons’ peak and when they fall is essential in managing your money.

In academic writing, for instance, seasons pick at around March-April, August-September and in December, which is the end-of-semester months. If one is freelancing designs for say, at a corporate company, it is essential that you understand their fiscal year and how they pay or contract employees then.

Know your worth

Some people may have you believe that since you are freelancing your services, they have to pay less that is required.

Knowing the pricing on your product and service is crucial in you making profits, in the long run. So, do not undervalue or overvalue yourself.

Know your worth as a freelancer, do not undervalue or overvalue yourself Click To Tweet

Factor in your expenditure

Granted, there is not much revenue that you put in when freelancing unless you are renting office space. Your internet plan, however, will straight out flatten your morale if you are not careful.

Choose an internet plan that is affordable for you, and that you know you can easily manage even when literally no clients are coming through because it will happen.

Ride the wave

High seasons in freelancing are really high, and what goes up will hit rock bottom with the same momentum. When that tide comes in, ride it like your life depends on it.

Work through the day and night, stock up on coffee or energy drinks, never see outdoors, whatever it takes, stock up on that money (just remember to factor in self-care, of course).

Stock up on some emergency cash

Yeah, things happen. Your regular client finishes school, your contract ends, life goes on. Set aside some money for an emergency just in case your bank account is depleted.

This actually goes for all businesses. It is standard.

Follow the 50/30/20 rule on cash

Personal financing is basically what will take you through freelancing. Know what you are spending your money on, track your receipts, cut down on the ‘for show’ products, and follow the 50/30/20 rule.

50% of your income is used on basic expenditure (like rent, food), 30% settle your debts and maybe a few luxury products, and invest with the 20% that remains. Or, follow this SLA guide prepared to cushion you from spending everything.

Network, network, network

Even in the low seasons, remind your clients that you are available, and ask them to refer you to other clients. Networking and good service are crucial in this business. If you are working in your pyjamas and at the convenience of your home all day, something has to give.

Even in the low seasons, remind your clients that you are available Click To Tweet

That said, like in any business, consistency and good product/service will bring you the money. Personal financing will ensure that the money sticks with you. Happy freelancing #MotherlandMoguls!!