Teach For Kenya is one of many independent chapters of the Teach For All Non-Profit organization, that is currently being set up in Nairobi, Kenya by Yukabeth Kidenda who is both its CEO and founder.

Passionate about education and mentorship, Yukabeth is on a mission to build a movement of ethical leaders to drive reforms in Kenya’s education ecosystem.

In this article, Yukabeth talks about her passion for teaching and her dream for education in Kenya.


What inspired the Teach For Kenya initiative?

Teach for Kenya is not the first of its kind, there are actually 50 other partner networks that exist all over the world.

Teach For All was started by Wendy Kopp, an American who actually started it as Teach For America initially. Her inspiration came from coming face to face with the inequities in education in her hometown and feeling a burden in her heart to help bridge those gaps.

From the success of that, she decided to replicate the model across other countries.

When I was done with college, I decided to take a gap year and went to serve as a teacher in Honduras, Central America.

That entire year was 365 of the happiest days of my life. I came back home, but for one and a half years, I couldn’t find a job.

That really made me question everything that I had believed. For a long time, I had this belief that education was what gets you to be successful.

I questioned that notion a lot and began to think –

  • How come the education that I received didn’t prepare me for this slump on the road?
  • How come this great education made me sit at home for over a year jobless?
  • Why didn’t it help me sell myself to a potential employer?

That is when things in my mind changed, I don’t want to just help people get access to education, I want to help them get access to QUALITY education that will enable them to thrive in this 21st century.

That’s why I dedicated my life to working in educational organizations.

I started with adult learning and corporate training, then worked with @Microsoft with their education team to push ICT training and certification – Yukabeth Kidenda Click To Tweet

I started with adult learning and corporate training, then worked with Microsoft with their education team to push ICT training and certification.

Thereafter I joined Metis where I was running a fellowship program for educators across all sectors and went on to work with the African Leadership Group as a leadership facilitator and now getting ready to launch Teach For Kenya.

I had been mulling over this with one of my mentors, Kennedy Odede for about one and a half years and by the beginning of 2019, I just decided to get on with it and actually do something. I think right now the country is ripe for such a great innovation and I’m glad to be at the forefront of it.

Why is education important to you?

I have a vast background in education, all the way back to my time in high school when my mother was diagnosed with cancer.

My parents really valued education a lot and still do, my siblings and I all went to very good schools. My mother’s illness did take a financial toll on the family but one thing I took note of, was that my father did not make us switch schools at any point.

We could have saved so much money by going to other schools that were not as costly and I could not understand why he chose to make that sacrifice. As I got older I realized the kind of doors that getting a good education and being exposed to that kind of learning could open for me.

During my university years, I approached my dad and told him that I want to support other people who don’t have people rooting for them the way he rooted for us.

My dad and I soon started doing a lot of projects in the community, going out to various areas, providing books, toiletries, things that just make the learning environment more habitable and more comfortable for the students.

That really generated the passion I have had since then to do more in the education field.


3. How is it going with putting together the launch?

It’s been a scary, engaging, challenging but exciting process all the same. One thing that has worked in my favor, is that this is my dream job. I’ve always wanted to work with people who don’t have anybody cheering them on and supporting them.

Teach For Kenya puts me in that unique position where I have basically taken the responsibility to run this organization that will help mentor recent graduates and put them in a position where they come face to face with the challenges facing their community, transitioning them on to the alumni face of the program and watching them go out into the world to impact and join initiatives that are seeking to address these challenges.

So I’d say right now that the education space in Kenya is very ripe. There are so many people who are very receptive to the idea of Teach For Kenya, and think it’s been a long time coming so the support has been overwhelming in a good way.

I plan to pilot this program with our first 20 fellows in January 2021 so what I’m focusing on right now is doing community research and going out into the areas where we will potentially get to speak to the communities, the teachers, students, and parents and find out what their needs are and how our skills can best match those needs.

It’s a lot of work but I feel like all of us as citizens of this country and this continent needs to do our part, this is me right now choosing to do my part.

I hope this encourages anyone who may think that their part may be too small – we’re all pieces in a puzzle of a beautiful bigger picture and by doing our part, we are working one day at a time to transform this country into one of the best.

With over 800,000 children in Kenya out of school, what do you think is a probable solution to this problem?

I’ll be very honest and say I really don’t have a solution myself but I will say that in everything that is done, there are pros and cons.

When free primary education was introduced in Kenya, there was a great influx of students into the public school system but the system was not prepared to take that influx. Click To Tweet

One of the reactions I remember that members of the community did was to start low cost private schools in the slum areas. These particular schools don’t have as much support as the government schools have.

The schools provided increased access to education at low costs but the level of accountability was reduced as a single teacher is not able to keep track of about 100 students alone.

What we need to do is champion more for the increase in the disbursement of resources especially to public schools, to enable them to absorb that high influx of students but also increase the level of accountability with teachers.

This goes back to a motivation issue because yes, they have more students to look out for but who is looking out for the teachers? That’s one thing that Teach For Kenya is really keen about – we want to celebrate and dignify the teaching profession because none of us would be where we are if it wasn’t for our teachers.

We need to place a bigger focus on teachers, building capacity for teachers, allocating bigger budgets to that sector.

We still have a lot of untrained teachers who are unemployed right now but the government just doesn’t have enough funds to train and employ them.

Children being out of school is a big issue and with Teach For Kenya, we really are committed to sending out more people to act as aspirational role models in the classrooms to try and dignify the teaching profession.

We will be recruiting recent graduates from every profession, we’ll have lawyers, engineers, musicians, etc in the classroom teaching.

That way, when a child looks up at their teacher, they will look at him/her with awe and because even after 4 years of law school, he/she still thinks it’s cool to be a teacher.

Which teacher/s in your life had the biggest impact on you?

I’d like to mention my high school principal – Mrs. Mbaya. I was always one of those well-performing kids in school, but I also did well in being naughty.

For most teachers, those two character traits could never reconcile, but for Mrs. Mbaya, I was just acting like a normal child. She made me feel like it was okay to be smart in class and also be a bit naughty.

When I got so much backlash from other teachers, she was the one person on my side. We had such a great bond that she would invite me to her house for tea over the school holidays, I really felt seen and understood by her.

Because of that, I was able to thrive in school. All the backlash I was constantly getting would have forced me to decide what part of the spectrum I wanted to be in, but thanks to her I successfully managed to be naughty and brainy until the end of my time at that school.

I am someone who loves people a lot so everywhere I have been, I have fallen in love with the people there.

For example, my kindergarten principal, Ms. Mildred Obuye, is still my friend to this day, we are now working in the education space together and we collaborate on various projects together.

All through my life though, my greatest teachers have been my parents, I can attribute 98% of what I have learned in life to them.

They are the greatest embodiment of what a teacher should be in this life which is engaging and willing to make a genuine human connection with a student.

What do you foresee for the future of education in Kenya?

Right now there are so many amazing things happening in the education space. Everyone is beginning to plant their small seeds of change with so many privately owned education ventures already taking off in Kenya.

It’s a great time to be alive as an educator in Kenya, we saw Peter Tabichi win the Global Teacher Prize and it shows that we are on the map and that it’s the right time to nurture those seeds that we have planted to continue the fight.

Kenyans are beginning to think outside the box, they are taking risks and being disruptive and what I can say to that is – keep doing what you’re doing. I’m really excited for all the innovation that is happening for all the alternative education systems.

What are your thoughts on homeschooling versus traditional schooling methods?

To speak for myself, I think it’s best that you find what works for you and for your child. This means connecting and knowing your child, understanding what they want and what they need and figuring out if it’s you who will be able to give it to them or the traditional school.

So I wouldn’t say I prefer the traditional system over homeschooling or vice versa but I would just say the center of education needs to be the learner, connect with the learner, find out their needs and then put them in the best place that would be able to satisfy those needs.

What mantra do you live by?

Honesty – You need to be honest in your dealings

Humility – You need to be humble because if you’re not you’ll never be able to hire people who are smarter than you to join your team and get you to success

Responsibility – We all have a responsibility first because God put us on this earth for a reason and we are responsible for the positions that we find ourselves in.  

Prayer – This is what has gotten me through everything in my life. My biggest supporter and cheerleader has been God, he has been my best friend through this whole journey and prayer is how I connect with him.


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