“I LEFT THE USA TO PURSUE MY PASSION IN NIGERIA.” MEET UGOCHI NWOSU, FOUNDER OF RELIANCE CLINICS

ugochi

Not everyone owns up to their purpose especially when it takes you from one continent to another. Ugochi left the United States to pursue purpose in Nigeria.

Ugochi is the founder of Reliance Clinics. She’ll be sharing insights into her life as a medical practitioner, health tips, the numerous challenges she faced and how she was able to overcome them. 


Who is Ugochi Nwosu?

I was born in Nigeria and lived there until I was 7 before my family immigrated to the United States. That was where I did all my schooling. After my undergraduate degree, I did my residency training in the States also until I returned back to Nigeria in 2019. This kick-started my goal to start a business that provided quality private healthcare services. 

What are you passionate about?

Healthcare! I really want to live in a world where everyone has full access to adequate healthcare. In Nigeria, the rate at which people in their early 40s and 50s die is really alarming. All of these can be avoided. 

I just want to help people live healthy and productive lives where they get to see their grandchildren and even great-grandchildren. Although this would be beautiful, it’s not easy. If people want to live till their late 80s, it starts from now. So, I want to keep educating people about this. 

What ignited the spark to start Reliance Clinics?

For me, the inclination to work in healthcare came since my undergraduate studies. I learnt about the possible challenges, the requirements and mapped out the areas to make an impact. It was important to be properly grounded in what I was planning to do to avoid making any silly mistakes.

I also worked with a whole lot of NGOs to ensure I had a feel of what I was about getting myself into. I didn’t really plan to start a business for myself. The decision to do that came after I kept searching for an NGO to work with but couldn’t find any at that point. This made me start looking for other possible opportunities

During my residency training, I met people who were interested in digital healthcare services and connected with them. They encourage me to just do what I need to do because no one makes actual change by talking and observing. It was great for me because I didn’t see myself as someone that could take up that level of responsibility upon myself. The plan had always been to work for someone who was already doing the things I needed to do. That’s basically how the business came alive. 

How was the startup phase of your business?

I’m not going to deny the fact that everything was new to me. Firstly, we had to scout for a suitable location, then we had to figure out a way to get supplies for the clinic and basically test these supplies yourself because everything had to be reliable 100%. 

For funding, I met the founders of a health insurance company during my residency training so things sort of worked out for me in the sense that they needed a trusted clinic that they could send patients to so they kind of gave me the initial funding for the clinic. 

What business challenges have you faced and how have those challenges shaped your mindset?

One major challenge has been hiring and training staff. For those in healthcare, the quality of services offered has to be nothing but excellent. Most times, doctors, pharmacists, nurses etc expect some things to be done in some certain way based on what they’ve seen before or something which might not necessarily be the right thing. 

When you tell this category of people that there’s a standard that should be met and we’re not going to overlook that standard just because we’re operating in Nigeria, it turns into a situation where it feels like you’re telling them that they’re not properly trained or something so that was a major challenge for me. 

Another challenge we had, in the beginning, was dealing with patients and staff who were used to things being done in certain ways and then we do them in totally different ways. For instance, most patients that come to our clinic are used to being given so many drugs even for not so serious cases. When we give them just 1-2 drugs, they feel like we’re not treating them the right way or we don’t really care about their wellbeing which is why we’re given them little amounts of drugs and that’s not the situation at all. 

What have you learned so far from running this business?

When it comes to hiring, you have to ensure that those people actually have the skills they claim to possess. It’s mandatory that you do. I’ve learnt over time that you have to be very intentional when deciding who to bring on board, how to evaluate their skills and how to train them so that from day 1, they can actually deliver. 

 

Ugochi is a participant in the High Growth Coaching Program 2020. Catch up on her business journey on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Why Your Business Ideas Aren’t Working

By ensuring that your goals are S.M.A.R.T, you set yourself up to experience the thrill of an achievement that will become a motivation for future successes.

Did you know that you can give 110% effort and fail miserably, even with a good business idea?

I’ve seen it more times than I can count. An eager entrepreneur has a brilliant idea and quickly forges ahead, only to come back disappointed that things did not work out.

By the time they come to that realization, they have likely invested a lot of money, energy and time that they will never get back.

Entrepreneurs going through this experience usually assume that they are simply not cut out for entrepreneurship.

It is at this point that I dig a little deeper into their execution process and I find that the real problem was that the idea or goal was underdeveloped, leading to poor execution. It was a set-up for failure from the start.

I then have the task of talking the entrepreneur off the ledge by explaining that there may have been nothing wrong with their effort, resources or intentions. The reason for the apparent failure was likely that the goal was an inherently bad goal.

When it comes to execution in business, a good goal is not just noble in its intention, but it also S.M.A.R.T.

It is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely. Ensuring that your goal meets these criteria increases the likelihood of success.

It eliminates wasted time and hones in on the best strategy for success.

Specific goals break down your general goals into manageable pieces so that they are easier to achieve. A great example of this might be to increase your annual revenue.

“Increase revenue in 2019” is a noble general goal.

An even better goal is to “increase revenue in 2019 by identifying profit leaks and creating monthly marketing campaigns in order to obtain new clients.”

Using that example, it’s easy to see how an entrepreneur can go from casting a wide net and taking a chance on what sticks, to identifying a specific strategy for success.

Even that specific goal can be further developed as you think about other factors that will affect the outcome.

By adding metrics and changing the goal to “increase revenue by 40% in 2019, by identifying profit leaks and creating monthly marketing campaigns in order to obtain new clients,” the direction and initial action steps are even clearer.

This way, there is little room for wasted resources and time.

The attainable and realistic factors in the S.M.A.R.T. formula are subjective factors determined by the individual’s readiness to start working on their goals.

An entrepreneur who does not have a marketing budget needs to first raise the money or create a budget for marketing before embarking on the goal above.

Without a budget for a robust campaign, attempting to increase revenue by creating marketing campaigns will prove futile.- @andrena_sawyer Click To Tweet

It seems obvious enough, but many entrepreneurs still do not count the cost before they set their foot on the pavement.

The last piece of the formula is timeliness. This ensures that the person setting the goal has a sense of urgency and can fend off complacency when working toward their goal.

It is easy to overlook this final piece, but it is just as critical as the others because it has two extremes: too much time allotted for the goal, and not enough time.

When there is too much time, it is easy to fall into traps of procrastination and complacency. These are traps that force individuals to believe they have more time to do the work than they actually do.

They lose their sense of urgency, which opens the door for others to leverage their ideas, or for a competitor to get to a product launch before they do. The other extreme is not to give yourself enough time.

No goal is perfect, and neither is every process, and there is room for imperfection. – @andrena_sawyer Click To Tweet

By rushing toward the goal, entrepreneurs stand the risk of sabotaging by not properly assessing the risks and all of the factors necessary for success.

After all, there’s value for the entrepreneur in trial and error and even failure.

However, by ensuring that your goals are S.M.A.R.T., you set yourself up to experience the thrill of achievement that will become a motivation for future successes.

Quick Maths (1): How to generate income to start a business with FDSH Asset Management

Smart moves early in life can pay BIG long-term…..

Now, what’s the point in looking good and slaying when your bank account isn’t smiling back at you? Listen. This is the year to SLAY 100%, and we’re ready to show you how to make money moves the right way.

So, are you ready to cash out like Cardi’s got nothing on you?

We are partnering with FSDH Asset Management Ltd to share with you a 4 part downloadable guide to enable you to boost your finances. We want to make sure that every Motherland Mogul is prepared to master the money world. 

Learn how to generate funds to start your business with @FSDHCoralFunds. Click here for more: bit.ly/FsdhGuide1 Click To Tweet

Topics this 4 part series will cover:

  • Seed Money: How to generate income (capital) to start a business.
  • Diversifying: Different ways to save and protect savings (for low and high-income earners).
  • Bottom Line: How to use your business net income to your advantage
  • Emergency Funds: Why you must have some investments.

Now let’s talk about you.

You’re about to start a business but you need capital to begin?  Girl, we’ve got you! In this first downloadable guide, we’ve done some Quick Maths for you, highlighting how you can generate capital for your business or launch your new project.

First, you need to understand that money does not come for free, as a MotherlandMogul, you have to know what your options are, and work towards them.

After reading this first downloadable guide, you’ll understand what moves to make to get closer to your money goals.

But what’s next after you get that capital and the bills start rolling in? We have more juice coming your way.

To continue learning basic principles that will lead to a happier and healthier financial you, get prepared for our next guide. Because girl, we’re going deeper.

FSDH ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD  – FSDH AM is a wholly owned subsidiary of FSDH Merchant Bank Limited. They are one of Nigeria’s leading asset management and financial advisory firm.

FSDH AM is versatile in financial transactions and investment strategies that meet the need of investors in an emerging economy like Nigeria. They recognize that today’s investors need the services of dedicated and expert professionals to provide them with intelligent investment counsel.

Therefore, their strategies are dedicated to preserving investors’ wealth while maximizing the value that they receive.

Once you’re through with this guide, visit FSDH Asset Management Ltd to know more and get all your pressing questions answered.


 Getting access to this guide is easy: just fill out the form below to join our community and get access to this guide, remember this is only part 1, there’s more to come – so stay updated. By joining our community, you also get to enjoy our AWESOME weekly content as well.

Nnanke Essien: The Visibility Expert

Nnanke Essien is a visibility strategist and business transformation coach. She helps individuals with awesome ideas, products and services to get seen and found by their ideal clients.

She does this using a 5 step visibility building process to build an effective and efficient visibility roadmap. Nnanke believes that the path to success is littered with awesome but poorly marketed ideas, hence her mandate is to support businesses find this sure pathway.

She is a John Maxwell Certified coach, a HR professional and a visibility builder round the clock. She has been supporting start-ups and businesses since 2007 even through college.


Why is it important to stay visible?

If nobody knows you exist, nobody will buy from you. It’s really that simple, you must always find a way for your ideal clients to remember that you exist. We call it top of mind awareness. In other words, if at any point your client has a need, your brand name should be top of mind.

How can brands stay visible despite strong competition on social media? 

Truthfully, social media isn’t going anywhere and the earlier business owners understand this and take ownership the better for brands. Firstly, to stay visible, brands must adhere to a stellar mindset.

Beyond this, brands need clarity on why they are in the business. This is in terms of the business mission, vision, values, identifying their business playing field (niche), their core message and their brand positioning on the value chain.

Brands also need clarity on their ideal clients. Who are the people whose lives and businesses will be transformed by virtue of the fact that this business exists?

Understanding the client’s exact needs, desires, challenges, what they need to transform, lifestyle, spending power and motivation is key to business visibility success.Finally, brands can also stay visible by authenticating their authority in the market. Having consistent, attractive and meaningful bio’s on their social media platforms can contribute to this. Their bio must contain relevant information on who the brand is.

Also, nurturing communities i.e groups, leveraging on content and becoming an information reservoir for clients can be a great way of authenticating authority. In all of these, consistency and building revenue generating models, systems, processes and assets are key to success and visibility.

What are your top three tips for business owners to incorporate into their brands?

  1. Have a consistent brand voice and visual appeal that is easy for people to spot and recognize.
  2. Focus on building relationships using KLT (Know, Like and Trust) techniques like live videos, Instagram stories, guest appearances et al.
  3. Leverage on content that your ideal clients need.

How can women balance putting themselves out there while not appearing too forward?

Woman know what you want. Don’t do things out of compulsion or pressure. The woman you buy shoes from didn’t shy away from her calling, the woman who sells human hair didn’t shy away from her calling.
Recognize your hustle. Validate it! Look for a group of persons or coaches and mentors who can help you identify your hustle, find your sweet spot, stay there, flaunt it and own it.

What do you wish more entrepreneurs knew about today’s changing marketplace?

I wish they would spend more time actually researching than copying and wasting endless time doing idle and non-income generating activities. Behaviors are changing. The spending power of your ideal clients is changing. Algorithms on all the social platforms you are using are changing.

What is the next step for you in 2018?

I want to have intentional positioning. This will include focussing on my visibility cure show and collaborating with industry veterans.

Rinsola Abiola – Intellectual Capacity is key to career impact in politics for young women

Ms. ‘Rinsola Abiola is the SA (New Media) to the Speaker House of Representatives in Nigeria, President APC Young Women Forum (APC-YWF), Board Member – Young Women in Politics Forum (YWiPF) and a Youth Representative for the APC Board of Trustees

Her career journey in politics is one that has taken precision and determination and an example worthy for young women looking to make a change from a political platform to emulate.


The representation of women in politics and governance is dismal - @Bint_Moshood Click To Tweet

What is your career role? 

I’m a Public Relations consultant and a young woman in politics. I currently head the All Progressives Congress (APC) young women forum, a support, mentorship, and capacity building group for young women aged 18-35, who are members or supporters of the APC.

I am currently the youngest person appointed to the APC board of trustees, and one of the three youth representatives.

 

When did your career in politics begin?

My full-fledged political participation began in late 2013. Before then, I was a member of civil society, through a number of youth-focused NGO’s.

The decision to join mainstream politics was informed by a desire to be part of the process, as opposed to sitting outside of it and offering criticism. I came to the realization that a political office would enable me to do so much more, and for a larger number of people than I could as an individual.

 

What impact can women in politics bring to a nation? 

The involvement of young women through mentoring and capacity building would ensure the grooming of a new generation of women who are prepared to hold both elective and appointive positions and have a clear strategy for engagement.

 

Are there special qualifications you need to have a head start in politics?

For basic political involvement, no. But when it comes to the elective office, there are minimum requirements established by law, e.g – completing a secondary education.

For appointive positions, one would require certain skills or qualifications in order to be deemed worthy of such a position. Intellectual capacity is key and formal education provides a level of refinement which helps a great deal.

It is also important to have good communication skills – this entails knowing the right way to engage a particular type of audience, from the highly educated to the not so educated.

 

What can young women do to be taken seriously in a male-dominated field?

Same as anyone needs to do if they want to be taken seriously, have something to offer, add value, develop a good number of skills required and seize good opportunities to prove your mettle.

Be loyal, dedicated and committed to the ideals of your environment. Take a professional approach to everything and distinguish yourself.

Do not leave room for doubt, and know how to be firm without being forceful or harsh Click To Tweet

 

What roles have you held in the past and how did that help in getting you to where you are now?

I served as the founding PRO of the APYF in 2014, and some months later, as the PRO/Secretary, when the APC Young Women Forum was formed, I also served 

These roles increased my knowledge of what young people actually desire from the government. I learned communication skills and how to view time as one of my most valuable resources. Most importantly, I learned how to have a strong work ethic.

I’ve worked with a magazine brand, in a bank, I got the required certification in public relations, a profession I had always admired and set up a firm

Politics is expensive and you need resources - @Bint_Moshood Click To Tweet

 

As one of the executives of the Young Women in Politics Forum (YWIPF), how will this help in empowering other young women to pursue a career in politics?

I’m set to begin a peer mentoring programme with young women both here in Abuja and other states of the federation, which will be aligned with the objectives of YWIPF. 

Also, knowing that a Forum exists for young women with similar interests will encourage many to join, as one thing I have noticed is that some are interested but are just at a loss as to how to begin.

8 Technology Hacks for your Growing Business

Whether you’re a new business owner or been in the game for a while, you all have one thing in common: you need to be on top of your game. Real talk. This is why I’ve put together eight of some of the easiest tools in this technology-driven world to propel your growing business.

Canva

Hands down, this is a favourite technology hack. It’s a simple graphic tool with thousands of templates at your disposal. Canva is great for designing Instagram and Facebook posts, posters, letterheads, infographics; in fact, all kinds of graphics. It’ll make anyone feel like a graphic designer. Certainly fuels my ego.

There’s a mobile version available too; and it’s free. Happy customizing!

PicMonkey

PicMonkey is my favourite photo-editing tool. There’s a free version with limited options, but it allows you edit, make collages selecting from a ton of templates, add text, resize and more. It’s also great for creating watermarks. You can choose the paid version if you require more features.

PicMonkey is amazing if you deal with a lot of content!

Hootsuite

Hootsuite is gold. This hack allows you schedule and sync your content across your social media pages. You can mention other social media handles whilst drafting in Hootsuite (and see if they’re the right ones). It’s great for shortening lengthy links as well.

Save time by scheduling up to thirty posts at a time!

Calendly

Calendly is a great tool for setting appointments. It’s a convenient way to send your availability to clients by sending them your link through which they can book a slot. Once the client books, you will receive an email confirming this. It will also be added to your calendar on Google and send you a timely reminder.

It makes perfect sense!

Office Lens

Maybe I’m just really lazy, but I use Office Lens to scan all my documents when I’m away from my desk. It’s great for emailing copies of documents on the go and is a lot tidier than using the camera on your phone. With Office Lens you can crop and make simple adjustments, save and even convert to Powerpoint or PDF.

What are you still waiting for? Download this tool now!

Fiverr

Fiverr is a freelance site with a large pool of sellers offering services for a lean $5 and upwards. There are basic tasks you may wish to outsource as a business owner, to enable you focus on your core. Browse through Fiverr for services such as business writing, video, branding, graphics work. There’s also Fiverr Pro for more technical, professional work.

Check reviews carefully before you buy!

Trello

Trello is amazing and absolutely easy to use. It’s like a little personal assistant that helps you keep track of the work you and your team have scheduled. You can update plans for the team to see and move across different stages. You can make checklists and add key team members to activities.

It’s fun and highly useful!

Quickbooks

Major hack here! This helps sort out your business accounting with an annual fee. You can keep track of payments, send invoices (and include your business logo), manage different customers’ finances. It can also be used on multiple devices. The best part is all your data is backed up.

It’s quite a technical tool so you’ll need to undergo a tutorial or training!

I got you covered with these technology hacks to meet your business needs from graphics, to accounting, to personal organisation, but there are tons of other good ones. So make sure to research and ask around.


Let us know here, which other technology hacks you love!

In conversation with creative agency JamJar about their website relaunch

JamJar was created in 2013 out of frustration with the way corporate and creative events were organised in Ghana. Many events felt poorly organised and were identical. As a result JamJars’ founding partner, Frances Quarcoopome, found the need to put her skills to work and provide the industry with a creative alternative.

JamJar continues to be recognised for its innovative and forward thinking design concepts and exceptional event planning services.

Their vision is to be the top African creative agency, fueled with passion, innovation and the desire to make every client happy.  


Tell us about Jam Jar

JamJar is a creative agency dedicated to providing clients across Africa with innovative, affordable and locally relevant concepts in events, design and pr.

You recently decided to rebrand and relaunch your website, why?

Our website got hacked. Although this was unfortunate, we saw it as an opportunity to review the layout of our website and the elements which needed to improve; and making sure potential clients have all the information they need.

 

Key steps to rebranding and relaunching a website

  1.  Assess what you want to achieve/ goals
  2. Ensure that your website development team is on board and understands your vision
  3. Decide on your layout
  4. Create or gather all the relevant content
  5. Proof read it,
  6. and send it to your development team
  7. Launch a demo site to see how everything looks
  8. Eliminate any kinks
  9. Make any changes necessary and then you’re good to go.

 

Why do organisations need to rebrand or relaunch?

I think it’s really important for organisations to rebrand or relaunch because it gives them an opportunity to reach a new audience; and to also look at how far they’ve come, and to ensure that this is reflected in the company branding and website.

Our main goal was to make it much easier for potential clients and partners to look through our portfolio and understand who we are as an agency. Hopefully creating a good enough impression that they want to hire us.

 

What tips do you have for someone looking to relaunch their website?

(1) Make sure you give yourself a deadline; (2) that your content is organized; (3) your images are high quality; (4) and remember to have fun.

 

You need a team that can provide you with all the support to make those things come to life. Our A-team is Ronin Africa. They’ve supported us from the beginning; they understand our vision as JamJar and allow us to be creative. They are flexible and open to new ideas; therefore we can create something truly unique to JamJar.

 

What goals do you aim to achieve through your website?

With our new website we hope to reach new clients, particularly international clients. We also want to provide our existing clients with a reference point, and to use our blog to share knowledge and events.

 

How has your new website positively impacted business?

So far the website has allowed us to confidently market our services, knowing our product is represented clearly. Our plans are to expand to the rest of Africa in the next 5 years, and the website provides a great launch pad for accessing these markets. It also ensures that we keep ourselves dynamic and fresh.

 

Website: jamjargh.com

Instagram: @jamjargh


Do you have an insightful story to share about your company rebrand/relaunch?

Let us know here.

Siphesihle Losi: I’m a fan of exceptional service

siphesihle losi

 Siphesihle Losi  is  the 25 year old owner of ILosi Events Management. She was born in Grahamstown, a small town in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, and as a child took part in ballet and contemporary dancing, which she still enjoys today. Sipesihle volunteered on campus radio when she was in High School, studied Travel & Tourism and has worked for one of the biggest events companies in Cape Town. At only 25, she is a rising powerhouse.


I’ve always known that I have the leadership skills needed to achieve the best results in whatever I do Click To Tweet

Tell us about yourself Siphesihle; where you grew up, your schooling, what you do etc.

My name is Siphesihle Losi and I am 25 years of age. I was born and raised in a small town called Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, where I studied at local public schools and later attended Rhodes University.

During my childhood, I took part in contemporary dancing and ballet. I later did a little bit of radio at Rhodes University radio station on a voluntary basis, until 2008 when I finished matric. I then moved to Cape Town to study Travel & Tourism at Boston City Campus. I also did Fashion Design at Design Academy of Fashion.

 

What first Inspired you to create your own business?

siphesihle losiWhat inspired me to create ILosi Events Management is the fact that I’m a fan of exceptional service; and I’ve always known that I have the leadership skills needed to achieve the best results in whatever I do.

I’ve played leading roles in my community and school, and have always received compliments for my great work ethic and good communication skills from friends, colleagues and superiors.

However, I only started my company in 2013, after I resigned from one of Cape Town’s biggest event organising companies (at the time). I suddenly realised that I had a huge following of students and community people who often called to ask if I could link them up with events/promotional work.

To be honest,  I was a bit annoyed because I was jobless at the time. But one of  my friends asked me why don’t I start my own company, and I laughed at him because I didn’t have any capital, but he slowly persuaded me into starting my own business and… here we are!

 

What do you enjoy about being an event organiser?

I mostly enjoy the unpredictable aspect of the work I do, because something as simple as unexpected weather changes can call for split-second improvisation on my part to make everything work.

I also enjoy the challenges that event organising comes with, because I feel that it strengthens me to grow and become a better person and businesswoman. It’s fun to meet with different clients, companies, staff and going to different venues, the travelling, the food and amazing chefs- just everything!

 

Take us through a typical day in your life as an Events Manager and overall Motherland Mogul…

siphesihle losiA typical day in my life begins with me waking up at 5am in the morning to prepare for my morning run. I always have my cell phone on hand to check emails and the social media pages before 7am, I then relax with a refreshing bath to kick-start the day. I’ll also have lots of water and some oats before filling my mind with work.

At work, no two days are the same, as I might be sewing dresses/aprons for the staff or getting some administration work done on one day, and attending to a 6am call time the next. Whenever I have an early call time I know that I’ll have to be up at 03:30am in order to get the job done right. All my clients know me as an early bird, keeping to a particular schedule helps to keep me organised and punctual.

 

What achievements are you most proud as a business owner?

What I’m most proud of thus far is the clientele I have, besides working on South Africa’s biggest events, my clients are good people to work with, and I have the opportunity to work alongside companies that have been in business for more than ten years. To me that’s something that I pat myself on the back for.

I also have the most amazing team in Johannesburg, Durban and North West, these are the people who saw the vision and mission I had as a young entrepreneur and decided to be a part of it and grow with me.

I am most proud of the fact that I’ve made a name for myself and I’m now able to inspire other young people who admire my hustle, as I continue to push through even the hardest times.

 siphesihle losi

What obstacles have you overcome as an entrepreneur?

I tend to take things personally and I am an impatient person. So I’ve had to learn not to take everything so personally, and have learnt to resolve issues with a calm approach. Most of the obstacles I’ve had, I overcame by asking for advice, seeking information especially from people that are in the same industry as I am, and what I’ve realised is that I don’t know everything and sometimes it is okay to seek assistance.

 

What are your future plans for ILosi Events Management?

The future for ILosi Events Management is to build an empire. I most definitely want to expand my services with the team I have, so I have been looking at décor designs. I would also like to have a permanent team and hopefully host our own events in the future.

How do you balance work and personal life?

I keep work very professional, my clients stay as clients and even though my friends happen to be business owners they are in different industries. I take great pride in building the best relationships with my clients and friends.

Things flow easily for me when I separate the two, but sometimes my friends suffer when I am a bit stressed out with work and I am not as bubbly as I normally am, but I try to keep things balanced.

 

What do you do for fun, and what are your interests outside of managing events?

I love running, contemporary dancing and I recently started playing tennis. I am now based in Johannesburg, so I don’t meditate by the beach or surf anymore, but I also enjoy that too.

 

What three tips would you give someone wanting to go into events management?

*Expect to work long hours and have little sleep.

*You need to enjoy constantly being in a crowd.

*Don’t expect to have a social or personal life because your work will become your life.


Do you have any insights on how to run a successful events management company?

Let us know here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lessons on Pitching: from JamJar Founding Partner Frances Quarcoopome

About Seedstars Pitch competition

Seedstars World promotes, connects and invests up to $1.5 million in emerging market startups, through its exclusive startup competition, held in in 60 countries. Seedstars is one of the largest pitch competitions in the world, they hold a series of local start up competitions, a regional one and then global.

 

The motivation to pitch

I had been following Seedstars for over 3 years, and had been thinking about pitching, however I didn’t quite have the idea yet. I just knew that if JamJar was going to expand into Africa we needed something scalable and relevant. Within the last 3 years of working in the events industry, our experience has highlighted challenges that our customers face, particularly international customers who are unsure about the African market.

I decided there was a solution for this: A platform which makes it easier for clients to find, book and plan events in Africa, through our network of venues and suppliers. This is what I pitched and although it was my first time pitching ever, I came second place.

The whole experience of pitching was thrilling and also interesting, in terms of venturing into the tech space. The one thing I noticed was also the fact that in Accra, I was the only woman pitching. Now, some people say this would have been an advantage, but considering that all the other contestants and the judges were male, I wasn’t too sure. I did however see this as a great opportunity to stand out further by delivering a stellar pitch.

 

Lessons learnt as the only woman pitching

  1. Don’t be intimidated, You know what you are capable of and no matter what, do what you have to
  2. Put your gender aside, let your capabilities shine through
  3. Never see it as a problem, rather an opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

 

Lessons for a successful Pitch

  1. Be clear about what your product is and what you are trying to achieve
  2. Practice your pitch, but most of all, your answers to the tough questions
  3. Get a mentor, someone who has pitched before that can guide you and give you valuable insights
  4. Sometimes it’s not about whether your product is good, but what the pitch competition is trying to achieve. You may have the perfect pitch, but if your solution doesn’t align with the goals of the fund, it may not work out. If you can find this out before hand, do so.
  5. The key here is to keep going, believe in what you are trying to create, and the problem you are solving.

The biggest lesson I learnt is that, there is still a long way to go for people and companies to acknowledge the tech innovations in the creative industries, particularly fashion, events, photography, design etc.

Many investors continue to focus on Fintech, agriculture, health and education, and although these may be the big industries, it’s also time to value the creative and service industries and provide them with the support they need.

 

About JamJar

JamJar was created in 2013 out of frustration with the way corporate and creative events were organised in Ghana. Many events felt poorly organised and were identical. As a result JamJars’ founding partner, Frances Quarcoopome, found the need to put her skills to work and provide the industry with a creative alternative.

JamJar continues to be recognised for its innovative and forward thinking design concepts and exceptional event planning services.

Their vision is to be the top African creative agency, fueled with passion, innovation and the desire to make every client happy.

http://www.jamajrgh.com/

instagram.com/jamjar


 Do You have any tips on how to deliver a successful pitch? 

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3 Awesome tools that can transform your company culture

“Culture is the organization’s immune system.” — Michael Watkins

Every entrepreneur’s dream is to grow a company that outlives them; every existing organisation’s hope is that their vision comes alive. One of the key factors in creating successful organisations, is that we must create an atmosphere that generates a love for what we do.

Over time, as society, we have come to accept that people enjoy doing what they are passionate about, they will take risks for things that speak to their hearts. Understanding this innate desire in every human being is essential to stimulating welcomed behaviours.

Our company culture is a way of doing things, what we do and how we do it repeatedly over time.

We must first of all determine the essence of who we are as a company and why we do what we do. We must understand what our vision and mission represents and how we can play roles in sustaining both.

A good work culture sets the standard for every occurrence, the way employees are hired, the daily interactions, incentives and opportunities that are offered. Our culture is reflected in how we treat ourselves internally and how we handle our customers, services and products.

Our way of doing work successfully is the practice that we must maintain. Clever CEO’s and team leader’s factor in the 3 C’s into their company’s mantra, these are the building blocks needed to create and establish patterns that build successful brands.

Communication

From the first day of work employees must adopt your way of communicating, how you manage crisis, how to receive and give feedback; also, how you analyze information, and how you want to be perceived by your customers and the public. For example, you can be known for the best after- sales care; while practicing these traits needs to be deliberate, it sets into motion after some time.Culture does not have to be big or overly dramatic.

 

Clarity

What makes the organisation? What drives your system? What attributes do you look for in an employee? How can you further develop those attributes? and how can employees be rewarded  when they adopt the attributes and values which help the organisation progress?

 

Consistency

This word cannot be over emphasized; good management practice implores us that good practice makes perfect. The one recipe to injecting a new or an existing culture is by maintaining and repeating the processes over and over again.

A good employee by default looks at the teammate that performs excellently and copies the behaviour of that person; humans desire to be the first. This awesome competitive streak can be beneficial to growth. It is more likely that people will emulate the ways of a high performing staff; especially the one who finds favour with customers or management.

 

good management practice implores us that good practice makes perfect Click To Tweet

 

Your company culture is your way of making best friends out of your processes and your people. According to Lazlo Bock, head of People Operations at Google: ”People operations are where science and human resources intersect. And it’s what keeps Google a top performing company”.

After making the list of best companies to work for, in Fortune Magazine’s annual list, Dan Satterthwaite, Head of Human Resources at the company Dream Works Animation said “We’ve been at it for over a decade in terms of really trying to create a unique and special place for people to come and do work; Any creative enterprise needs an environment where people can explore and feel valued and you can’t create that in a dungeon.”

Creating a winning organisational lifestyle involves a lot of work, finding the right people who add the finishing touch to what you want to establish, and providing the environment necessary for change. Cultures are not stagnant they are living beings who flow freely in time and space.

‘An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage’- Jack Welch


Do you have tips on how to build an amazing company culture?

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