Jobs – Product Manager

She Leads Africa is a digital media and events company that believes in the power of young African women to build amazing careers and businesses, serve as community leaders and influencers, and eventually take over the world. Our organization has been featured on CNN, Black Enterprise, Forbes and CNBC Africa.

We’ve worked with brands including Dark & Lovely, Uber, Cointreau, Samsung, and Facebook.

Our #MotherlandMoguls, as we affectionately call them, are the reason we exist. Our mission is to provide them with inspiring, educational events and content to help them live their best lives. 

We’re looking for a product manager to help drive product planning and execution throughout the product development lifecycle, from gathering product and customer requirements to product introduction. 

Reporting Structure: The Product Manager will report directly to an SLA co-founder. 

The Product Manager will be responsible for improving all aspects of SLA’s end-to-end community journey and drive product decisions to meet business objectives.

Responsibilities:

  • Design and manage product roadmaps, ensuring timely completion of deliverables along the entire product lifecycle: from concept through production, from sustaining improvements to value engineering. 
  • Generate detailed documentation (including market/product requirement documents), communicate these requirements to the appropriate teams, and ensure timely cross-functional execution.
  • Manage an outsourced development firm and determine product priorities and resource allocation.
  • Facilitate the design of creative and innovative solutions that encompass the entire customer journey and actively question solutions to ensure alignment with product/company vision.
  • Determine the best metrics for product success. Combine intuition with data analysis to continually drive product improvement.
  • Provide input into product pricing, go-to-market, development budgets, and sales forecasts.
  • Cultivate a deep understanding of our customers throughout their lifecycle, and advocate for solutions based on their needs and pain points.
  • Monitor and report on sales and customer satisfaction metrics and offer data-driven insights about what new products or product lines will have the greatest impact for our customers and business.

We are looking for someone who:

  • Has 3+ years of relevant product management experience.
  • Has a strong project management background, with demonstrated ability to execute on tight deadlines.
  • Has recorded huge success working in a startup environment where you have taken ideas from conception to execution.
  • Has the ability to juggle multiple priorities.
  • Has exceptional communication skills, and demonstrated ability to build high-trust relationships.
  • Has an engineering or design background; experience bringing a physical product to market required.
  • Has experience guiding cross-functional teams in a highly iterative, rapidly evolving agile environment.
  • Has excellent analytical skills with demonstrated experience turning data into actionable insights.
  • Has experience with A/B testing, UX/UI principles and customer research techniques.
  • Has a can-do attitude and is flexible enough to take on any task we throw at them
  • Is passionate, hungry and eager to build SLA into a world-class institution
  • Has high professional and ethical standards i.e. understands that there’s no such thing as African time – you’re just late
  • Is comfortable taking and giving feedback
  • Has a good sense of humor – because we’ll be working hard so we better keep each other entertained
  • Is comfortable working in a startup environment where we’re making the rules up as we go along.

Ultimately we’re looking for someone who wants to be part of something great. Someone who wants to help us create one of the best African companies in the world. 

Submit your application here:

Oh!! Those nerves: 6 ways to deal with nervousness at job interviews

“I get nervous when I don’t get nervous. If I am nervous, I know I am going to put on a good show” – Beyonce Knowles.

I have (like most people) experienced nervousness at one point or another. Especially when at a place or situation that needs you to create an impression to someone or group of people you are meeting for the first time.

The feeling encountered takes on many forms. It could be a rumbling stomach, sweaty palms, distorted speech, temporary memory loss, shaky feet, rambling, fear, unable to smile, dry mouth, heart beats too fast, breathing issues and some form of tiredness to some.

Nervousness can affect the most confident and prepared person. Dealing with it takes awareness of the likely symptoms and an understanding of how to mange them so that it does not get the better of you.

Try this 6 tips to overcome the nerves

1. Prepare

A lot of what we do centers on preparedness, and an interview process isn’t left out. Take the time to practice and organize your thoughts. You can role play with a friend/partner/expert, research on the role, company, job description, practice your answers to likely questions.

You should also note down key talking points as well. Think of it this way – if you study for an exam to pass it, why do you think studying to ace an interview isn’t necessary?

2. Pause

Interviews are what they are. Have the understanding that you are in a conversation to show your eligibility for that role. And when you find yourself forgetting what was asked or you have no idea what the answer may be, because the nerves have kicked in,  just pause.

Take a minute to think things through and collect your thoughts before launching in again to answer the questions.

3. Please, breath! 

I mean this literally. Shortness of breath can also be from trying to hold your breath in so that you can just rush out those words. This can make you get more agitated.

We need you alive after the interview so please breath in and out while taking the time to respond. If you are offered a glass of water, accept it. You may need it if you experience dry mouth.

4. Ask the question again

This is a statement you should get used to. Do not feel it is a crime to request that the interviewer repeats him or herself. It does not make you look or sound dumb.

For clarity purposes, ask for the question again especially if you know you did not understand it at first. It is better to do this than to assume and ramble on or talk off the mark.

5. Your arrival matters

Following on from point number 1, get yourself ready and check you have the exact location for the interview. Have the appropriate wardrobe and grooming you need to appear presentable.

You need to have details of the office phone number (in case you need to ring in for an emergency), the method of interview, time zones (where applicable), the job/role information on who you are to meet.

Aim to arrive 10-15 mins early so that you can relax, calm down, have a chit-chat with those you see at the building or simply collect your thoughts.

6. Take notes

Summarise and note down at least 5 things you need the interviewer to know about you. List any questions you may have that needs more clarity, jot down points as they answer your questions.

This points back to preparation.

Remember that interviews are an evaluation of your suitability for that role/job at that particular point in time.

Many factors inform the decision of the recruiter so never exit an interview feeling like a failure and always put in your best at all times.


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Jobs – Instagram Associate

She Leads Africa believes in the power of young African women to build amazing careers and businesses, serve as community leaders and influencers, and eventually take over the world.

Our MotherlandMoguls, as we affectionately call them, are the reason we exist – to provide them with more inspiring and educational content to help them live their best lives.
We’re looking for an Instagram guru who’d like to join us in building She Leads Africa *to become the* number one destination for smart and ambitious African women.
This role is only open in Lagos, Nigeria and Cape Town, South Africa only.

Reporting Structure: The Instagram Associate will report to the Head of Digital Content.

Responsibilities:

  • Be proactive about ensuring that SLA is a part of important conversations related to African women, business, career, and life
  • Grow the number of Instagram followers and page engagement
  • Lead weekly strategic meetings on content direction on the Instagram platform
  • Establish and deliver community engagement goals on a weekly and monthly basis
  • Utilize data and analytics to drive decision making and advise social content and editorial decisions
  • Oversee social content production and editing every week
  • Develop new concepts and series for the community and seek out contributors
  • Listen to our users and encourage dialogue on our platforms.

Requirements:

The ideal candidates will have an interest in building, growing and scaling communities. You don’t have to have official work experience doing this kind of work but we want someone who is passionate about digital content and can learn quickly.
If this role is for you, you’ll be excited to work in a fast-paced environment and committed to working until the job is done.

Specific requirements include:

  • Intellectual curiosity and an interest in learning new skills
  • Excellent English writing skills and the ability to adopt and change your style of writing
  • Experience in building and growing communities across markets using a variety of content, marketing, and partnership strategies
  • Knowledge of digital marketing strategies
  • Social media savvy and being up to date on current trends
  • Able to deliver on metrics-driven results and an understanding of analytics
  • Graphic design and video editing skills are a major plus

Benefits:

  • Entry level salary with commission
  • Opportunity to travel across Africa and interact with Africa’s leading voices and entrepreneurs
  • Work with a moderately fun team who’s just tryna change lives and help women get that schmoney.

Applications close on April 27, 2018.

Submit your application materials here:

Unfortunately due to the number of applications we receive, we will not be able to contact everyone who applies. We will not be able to answer additional questions via email.

Is it a good idea to move back to Nigeria?

Bitstrips

It seems like everyday, there’s another of your friends who is moving back to the promised land of Nigeria for a shot at making it big. They either grew up or attended schools in the UK, America or South Africa, etc. Our generation seems to be leading the great diaspora exodus from the comfortable Western world and jumping back into Nigeria for a chance to “make it”.

But for those of us who aren’t yet convinced that moving back to Nigeria is the right move, there are typically a couple of questions that come to mind:

– Are there are any real opportunities there that I can’t find anywhere else?

– How do I even get situated in the job market and meet the people who can help me find a job?

– What things should I be looking out for to make sure I don’t get hustled?

– Should I ask for the same salary I made before?

As founder of a recruitment firm specializing in connecting diaspora returnees (Nigerians who have studied/worked abroad) with top companies in Nigeria and a returnee myself, I’ve faced all of these questions and more.

Here is some advice for you on the areas with the biggest opportunity and some helpful do’s and don’ts.

Ready to move back?

Employers want what you’re offering. Diaspora Nigerians (aka repats) are the ideal package for employers as they help bridge the capacity gap in-country while simultaneously fulfilling local content obligations. As Nigeria becomes more globally competitive, repats are in the best position to maximize on the opportunities that accompany such growth.

Those on the fence about moving back are being seduced by the promise of endless champagne nights, parties, and lucrative money making ventures. However, as likely as this may be, it’s extremely important to make sure that you are fully prepared for dealing with all sides of Nigeria, not just the glitz and the glam. You must have a clear plan about meeting your basic needs, that aren’t so basic in Nigeria (e.g. housing, transportation, electricity), otherwise you are on a fast-track to misery and likely to leave without maximizing your full potential, but I digress!

All things being equal, lets assume you’re prepared for the move, let’s move on to what opportunities are on ground that aren’t available in more developed markets.

Opportunity:

Old dog, new tricks

Major multinationals that have been on the continent for decades have refocused their global priorities to favor their sub-Saharan markets, Nigeria, in particular. Their increased investment is due to the market size opportunity available here. Several companies have instituted specific programs for moving diaspora Nigerians to work full time in Nigeria indefinitely or for a set period of time. If you’re working in a company that has an office in Nigeria, definitely enquire about this, and move back corporate style.

Nigeria’s new wave of transition has led to an increase in development projects in established industries such as infrastructure (power, water, roads, etc.), agriculture, manufacturing, telecommunications, healthcare, you name it! Innovation is driving Nigeria at the moment, so you have to find the right opportunity at a major firm for what you are passionate about and drive it home.

Ecommerce Start-Ups

This is the golden goose for young Nigerian professionals considering moving back. Start-ups are great ventures to move back to work for, especially if you have long-term entrepreneurial ambitions. I actually moved back with a popular ecommerce company many moons ago and my experience there was invaluable!

They are extremely ambitious, have long-term growth strategies for Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa, and are looking for repatriated talent that has local understanding to really drive their objectives. There is immense opportunity for growth but just make sure you do your research on the right ones to join and ask detailed questions about your role, responsibilities, short-term and long-term objectives.

If you are on the same page, the sky is the limit with a start-up.

Do your thang

If you have a bright idea, pursue it. Do this intelligently and fearlessly. The opportunity potential here is true, the time for new ideas is not dead, even if someone is doing what you want to do, the market is big enough for both of you. I have friends that own bakeries, fashion labels, financial services companies, blogs, consulting firms, farms, you name it and are actually successful (no expensive hobbies here). If you know what you want to do, do some serious research, speak to the right people, and carry-out your plan. If you provide a great service, you will have clients. This is a huge consumer population with growing pockets. Create, plan, and deliver.

Do’s/Don’t

  • DO be open minded to different opportunities that you wouldn’t have previously considered. You moved back for a change, so go ahead and try something different.
  • DON’T just take any job that has the highest paycheck. Find something you’re passionate about and don’t feel pressured into a role that you won’t perform in.
  • DO network with people that have different backgrounds. This is the best way to find new opportunities and friends that can help you get acclimated in a new city.   
  • DON’T have an entitled attitude. If you’re coming from abroad people are looking for you to show that, so surprise them.
  • DO find things to do that remind you of your life back home (e.g. weekly manicure, grocery shopping/cooking, intramural sports teams). Moving back can move you out of your normal routine so find the things that keep you sane and feeling settled. 
  • DO keep following She Leads Africa to stay motivated and help you achieve your dreams

Compensation

This is an area that causes frustration for both returnees, the employers and the recruiter (aka me ). Employers tend to find repats “entitled” for expecting higher pay than market rate; repats expect to be paid internationally competitive salary’s given their education, and experience in other markets, and I, the recruiter, am stuck in the middle!

When discussing salary with potential employers, it’s always best to do the following:

  1. Research – what are companies in Nigeria offering from the role you are interested in
  2. Transparency & Flexibility- Let your expectations be known but also be open to reasonable negotiation
  3. Be a saleswoman – Sell yourself girl! (not in the pretty woman way) but be confident about your skillset, value, and why you are worth the amount that you are asking for

If you take these 3 tips into consideration, you will be in a better position to get what you want, or at least close to it. It works for other people, why not you.

She-Pointers

  • Your network is your net worth. Networking is vital in this community and is the best way to open doors for your career
  • Just Do It. Don’t waste time over planning or overanalyzing every decision, you lose valuable time and time is money.
  • Breathe! Nigeria can be a very frustrating climate to operate in, especially when you are used to certain procedures abroad. In order to not to be frustrated 75% of the time you should accept that things work differently here and not freak out when things don’t go seamlessly.

I love sharing advice on how to make sure your return to Nigeria is a positive one. If you have more questions, add them to the comments below or find me at ResourceNigeria.com.