Evelyn Ngugi: Hard Work Only Makes Things Better

The YouTube world has grown exponentially in the past few years thanks to more and more people using it as a platform for content creation.

YouTube has produced big names in the digital world such as Lily Singh, Patricia Bright, Jenna Marbles and the like. Kenyan-American YouTuber, Evelyn Ngugi is well on her way to the creme of the crop of content creators with her channel, Evelyn from the Internets which currently boasts 150k+ subscribers and even got the stamp of approval from the Queen bee herself, Beyonce.

Evelyn recently took a trip back to her home country for the first time in over a decade and spent some time meeting her internet cousins (her name for her subscribers) and discovering Kenya again as an adult.

SLA managed to get some time to chat with the hilarious Texas native on her growth in YouTube, her thoughts on the creative industry in Africa and what’s in store for her in the future.


You started making YouTube videos way before it became the IT thing to do. What got you interested in that medium of sharing?

Tinkering with different media has always been an interest of mine. As a child, I would dub my “radio show” over old cassette tapes.

As a teenager, I would enlist my little brother to record “TV shows” and burn them onto blank DVDs. YouTube/the Internet was just next up, in terms of accessible technology.

How has social media helped grow your brand?

I’m more interested to know what people think my brand is, to begin with! Social media changed the game because it makes people and their processes accessible. For example, we used to only be able to interact with musicians or actors when their work was released or they had a press interview.

With social media, those barriers are gone. It’s scary and cool but mostly cool. Social media helps grow brands by putting creators directly in touch with consumers.

Focus on making an amazing product first. Social media algorithms will have changed 10 times by the time you’re ready to advertise - Evelyn Ngugi Click To Tweet

We love that you stan hard for various Black Girl Beauty Brands. What advice would you give to young women out there looking to start and/or build their own brand?

Focus on making an amazing product first. These social media algorithms will have changed 10 times by the time you’re ready to advertise anyway.

So many people want to be a “brand” but they don’t actually have a product yet.

 

You recently took a break from the daily routines of life as explained in your recent video. Why did that happen?

The break was the decision and goal I made for late 2017 and the rest of 2018! Something about being 27, girl… it makes you realize that you are in control of your time.

Do I want to spend the tail end of my precious twenties feeling stuck, or do I want to pivot into something greater? I chose greater.

What inspires you as a creative and what drives you as an entrepreneur?

I’m definitely a creative, but not an entrepreneur (yet). I think that’s just a misconception of being on the Internet. I’ve been #TeamHaveA9to5 my entire adulthood (which isn’t long) and I’m only now figuring out if I want to work for myself.

What inspires me as a creative are how innate and infinite my imaginations are and how hard work only makes things better.

So toddlers are creative, but those toddlers eventually grow up and become Martin Scorsese or something and that’s just incredible to think about. Not even trying to be funny, but as an entrepreneur, I imagine not being homeless or hungry would be the biggest driver.

You cut your own check and that sounds stressful fam!

You recently visited Kenya for the first time in over a decade. What are your thoughts about the creative space in Kenya vs other African countries?

Hmmm – that’s such a huge question for a first generation kid-essentially-turned tourist! From my brief time there, I noticed creative folks were frustrated.

What does it mean for music to sound Kenyan? Fashion to look Kenyan? When we talk about Nigeria or South Africa or even neighboring Tanzania, some of those things are more clearly defined or accepted.

I think Kenyan artists need more financial, governmental, and societal support to elevate Kenyan creative works where they belong.

Who are your top 5 YouTubers?

I feel like these answers change every time – thanks to YouTube algorithm! So right now, in no particular order:

KickThePJ: He’s just fantastical and whimsical and embodies what I still admire about YouTube. Making stuff up. Making stuff with your hands. Combining the two. A multi-media filmmaker.

Beleaf In Fatherhood: As a single, child-free person, it is difficult to find a family channel that holds my attention. This family combines my love of dope music with an attention to detail and story that is unmatched.

Oh, and it’s #blacklove all the way.

Patricia Bright: She is OG YouTube. She is still here. And she’s killing it. I think she’s gorgeous and hilarious and if you can make someone who wears black 90% of the time (me) still be thoroughly entertained by a 30-minute video of you trying on clothes??! SUBSCRIBE.

F0XY: Jade has such a distinct comedic tone and voice and I just want her to win. Because if she wins, I feel like I can too. She’s relatable like that. Inappropriate and so, so relatable.

Lavendaire: She is a sweet whisper of lavender essential oil infused vapor that calms me down and helps me be productive all at the same time. Gorgeously branded channel and impactful content.

Do you plan on moving on from YouTube to mainstream television or the big screen?

My plan for 2018 is to do more screenwriting and share more stories – both my own and those of my fellow earthlings.

Where those stories end up for your viewing pleasure isn’t necessarily the most important part of my plan. But if a TV show or movie wants to holla, I’ll definitely clear my google calendar!! Shoot!

What would you be if you weren’t a YouTuber?

YouTube is just a platform. I’d be doing the same thing I’m doing now, just on whatever website ended up popping off instead of YouTube. I’m a journalist, storyteller, funny girl, and hopefully, a friend in your head.

What is your mantra in life?

“Be thoughtful and silly.” That’s a quote from Hank Green about what it means to be an adult. Growing up and becoming boring/bored terrifies me, so I find comfort in that idea.

Being silly is still allowed – thank God. Stay childlike, not childish.


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Joy Kendi: Your 20’s are not for chilling. Work hard now, so you can relax later

Joy Kendi is a lifestyle blogger, vlogger and content creator who covers everything from fashion, beauty, and travel.

She has built her creative career from the ground up, constantly teaching herself along the way to allow for continuous growth in her profession.

Joy is a SLAYboss and runs things on her own terms earning her global recognition and her story below tells us that this journey is only the beginning of far greater things to come.


When did you first get into blogging?

I’ve always been interested in fashion, ever since I was a young girl. I wanted to get into design after high school but most of the schools I applied to didn’t offer scholarships and I don’t come from a wealthy family so I had to scrap that idea.

I took up styling right after college for about six months and I hated it. So I quit that and the blogging bug hit me.

Back then, when blogging was still quite relevant and at the time it was just a hobby, I had been following a few blogs.  Never thought I could make money off of it, until about a year later when Nancie Mwai (popular blogger in Kenya) got the opportunity to go to Germany because of her blog and my entire mindset on it changed.

Then I decided to focus on it more and figure out how to make it more of a business. I knew nothing at the time but I just hit the ground running, going to different offices, telling them about me and what I can offer them.

That’s really how I learned most of the stuff I know now, through trying and getting rejected.

Weirdly enough, everything didn’t change until I shaved my head and I’m not sure why but going bald was the first step in getting people to see me as a different person and not just a regular blogger.

Your 20s are not for chilling, work yourself to the core now - @justjoykendi Click To Tweet

I realized that fashion is very limiting, especially in Kenya, so I started to expand more into beauty.  Then tried travel and food and all that turned into a lifestyle direction for me.

Less than two years ago, lifestyle blogging opened a lot of doors for me because it meant I could do anything – be it advertising phones, makeup, hotels, restaurants, airlines, even countries!

 

What three things do you consider while creating content and/or partnering up with a brand?

My biggest thing to consider when I’m partnering up with a brand is to answer the question – do I or will I actually use the said product? If I do use it, does it go with my brand? And third, will this propel me in a positive or a negative direction?

When it comes to content creation, I think about:

1. How much work is it and how much time will it take on my end because that’s how I figure out my rate.

2. What have other content creators within the continent done in regards to the product that I need to create content for?

3. Is there a possibility of collaboration with others? If I know a friend or fellow blogger who can do it too, I will always try to bring them in and we both benefit from the job.

 

 

Was this your career of choice? What would you be if you hadn’t gone the blogging route?

If I wasn’t doing this I’d probably still be working in TV/film production. When I was still in school, I was interning at a local TV network, KTN and I was also working in a production company, behind the scenes doing things like writing scripts.

I got burnt out for a while though, which is why I eventually quit at the beginning of this year and solely focused on content creation.

I went to the University of YouTube and watched how other people do photoshoots and edits Click To Tweet

You take 90% of your images, manages your blog and brand on your own. Is there a particular reason why you chose to be a one-woman team?

Well when I first started out, my boyfriend would take my pictures. Due to our different schedules though, I realized I needed to learn how to do this on my own.

When starting out you don’t usually have a flowing income to be able to pay photographers so they would usually do it as a favor to build their portfolio as you build yours.

If they get a paying gig, they will pick that over you thus leaving you stranded once again, so getting a photographer wasn’t an option for me.

I went to the University of YouTube and watched how other people would do things like editing, photo shoots, what cameras to use, what kind of specs to look for and with that information, I slowly started to invest in myself.

I write all my proposals, attend meetings, create content, and do my own accounts Click To Tweet

I saved any money I got to buy my own equipment i.e. camera and lighting equipment, a laptop, computer programmes etc.

It is important that I have a say in what I do, and have control over what goes on with my work such as the editing process.

Before now, I used to have a manager who was actually very nice but sometimes we’d bump heads over things like working with certain companies so these among other reasons is why I decided it’s better to learn and do everything myself.

It’s a very stressful job I can’t lie – I write all my own proposals, attend all the meetings, create the content, send to the client, wait for approval, do my own accounts… It’s so much work but it’s how I prefer to work and also means I don’t have to pay anyone else.

 

What challenges have you faced as a blogger so far?

Getting paid is the biggest challenge and there’s a lot of corruption especially in regards to big global companies that hire agencies here to handle their brand. A budget usually set aside for influencers such as myself is misused by the agency and we end up getting short-changed.

Another challenge is getting burnt out. I kinda got burnt out with blogging, I got bored and couldn’t see more ways to make talking about outfits exciting again. That’s why I got into YouTube, which is so fresh and so much fun. Getting burnt out helped me expand and open up new opportunities, which I never thought I could do before.

One last challenge I will add is learning how to say no. I usually have a list of companies that I would like to work with and if a similar company approaches me that isn’t on my list, I will say no to them, with the belief that the company I really want to work for will come knocking one day.

It’s hard because that is essentially saying no to a paycheck, but I have a belief in my brand and how big it can grow and I think the companies I have written down, will be key in helping my brand grow.

Don’t assume that everyone knows you exist, you have to make yourself known Click To Tweet

What has been the proudest moment of your career so far?

The Hidesign campaign I just wrapped up in India. My face is in ELLE magazine, in an entire two-page spread!

The HiDesign people linked up with me online because they were planning on opening up a couple of stores in Nairobi. They liked my style so they wanted to meet me.

The head of the company explained how he started the company, his inspiration being how great colored skin complements leather. I was so inspired by his story and his vision, I decided to take a picture with the bag gifted to me by the company, just to say thank you while using his inspiration as my inspiration.

The picture that I posted is what got me the job as the face of Hidesign bags, just like that. Most of the jobs that I’ve gotten came about by chance, mostly because of the passion I have for what I do.

My next goal is Vogue, I’m putting it out into the universe!

 

Do you think vlogging is the new blogging? Do you think blogging will still hold relevance in the future?

People are not interested in reading blogs anymore, they’d rather just use 5 minutes, look at what you did over the weekend and move on.

Vlogging also gives your audience a different view of you. Blogging isn’t what it used to be. It’s hard to tell whether it’s ever going to come back to what it was.

Things are moving fast and people want to consume as much information as they can in a very short time.

 

How would you encourage young women who want to build a brand using social media?

I can’t really tell you how to do it because a lot of things have changed and getting things like followers now isn’t as easy as it used to be.

I would say figure out your brand first if your content is good, companies will be willing to work with you. Figure out your demographic, what stories you are trying to tell because not everything works for everyone, that helps a lot with your direction.

You need to be very patient, it gets hard, especially when just starting out but you have to put yourself out there. Don’t assume that everyone knows you exist, you have to make yourself known.

 

Who are your top three favorite fashion bloggers and YouTubers?

YouTubers: Casey Neistat, Philip DeFranco, Jenna Marbles

Fashion Bloggers: Karla Dera, Song of Style and Fashion bomb daily

What is your life mantra?

‘Work hard now, so you can relax later’. Your 20s are not for chilling, work yourself to the core now, where soon enough your name will make money on its own.


If you’d like to share your story with She Leads Africa, let us know more about you and your story here

Mona Faces: Taking over makeup artistry in Uganda one face at a time

“The future is female and African”- is a phrase I’ve heard many times but it was only after my conversation with Mona that I had the feeling of having met a true embodiment of this phrase.

Mona is the young entrepreneur behind the brand “Mona faces” which has taken the Ugandan makeup artist scene by storm and is certain to leave an everlasting mark on the entire African continent.

I had the opportunity to conversate with Mona about her business, her life, and her future.


Who is Mona?

Umutoni Monalisa, also known simply as Mona, is a self-taught makeup artist, a self-proclaimed perfectionist and a connoisseur of beauty.

Mona is a 25-year-old entrepreneur whose passion has led her to the path to mastery of makeup artistry and who is set to take Uganda and indeed Africa by storm, one master class at a time.

Mona holds a degree in Office and information management which she obtained from Makerere Business School.

I taught myself how to do makeup through YouTube - @monafaces Click To Tweet

How did your entrepreneurial journey begin?

Shortly after Senior 6, unfortunately, my father passed on leaving me with the formidable responsibility of taking care of myself and my siblings in whatever I could.

I remember thinking to myself that it was now my responsibility to take care of my family. In my senior six vacations, I started working for Bold in Africa- an upscale fashion boutique in Kampala- have I had the opportunity to meet and be mentored by the founders of the brand, Nunu Mugyenyi, and Angel Kalisa, who taught me how to run and manage a business.

Having learned the fundamentals of business from these two ladies, I partnered with some friends in my first year at university and opened a retail outlet- buying clothes from downtown and reselling them to clients in the urban areas.  

With all this taking place, I still nursed a deep passion for beauty and makeup. I started reading lots of magazines, watching tons of YouTube videos, following makeup artists on Instagram and learning from them with the dream that I would be able to someday turn this passion into profits.

With the help of a friend who worked at blush media, I organized my first ever photoshoot showcasing my talent, to my surprise and delight, my work went viral within a short amount of time and as they say, ‘the rest is history.’

I officially started Mona faces in October 2014, which is when the pictures from my first professional shoot went viral.

Women have often been told to choose between work and family, what are your thoughts on this? Can a woman have it all?

Women can have it all- but not all at the same time. I think a woman can have a wonderful career as well as a great family, what matters is the timing.

A woman might decide to first focus on her career or her business until it grows to the point where she can step back from it a little and give her attention to her family and vice versa. But then again, I’m single so I wouldn’t know.

All I’ve known for a long time has been work, work, and more work, but I do believe that it’s all about timing.

Women can have it all- but not all at the same time - @monafaces Click To Tweet

If you could have any superpower in the world, what would it be and why?

Invisibility. I’d like to be invisible because I love working behind the scenes.

What would you say African entrepreneurs should keep in mind to grow their brands?

African entrepreneurs must stay hungry, that’s the most important thing they should keep in mind.

I think a lot of female entrepreneurs get comfortable very easily- if she can pay her rent, and look good in the process, maybe buy a car- then she is satisfied.

I think the goal is to achieve as much as possible and never let yourself get comfortable. At the time that I started Mona faces, there were no recognizable makeup studios in Kampala, I had to learn and build my brand and in the process sort of paved the way for other makeup artists to be able to join the industry as well.

If you could have anyone in the world as your mentor, who would it be and why?

I have been blessed with so many people in my life that I count as mentors already, right from my very first bosses, Nunu Mugyenyi and Angel Kalisa, who still mentor me to this day, all the way to friends and family.

Ann Kansiime also plays a huge mentoring role in my life, I admire her success and ambition. Internationally, though, I’d say powerful women like Oprah Winfrey are a great inspiration.

Honestly, If I could have every successful businesswoman mentor me, I would. I admire powerful business women across the world.

You can never fail, you can never fall, you simply learn - @monafaces Click To Tweet

What is your greatest business lesson?

Like a lot of people, change terrifies me and it wasn’t until I realized- you can never fail, you can never fall, you simply learn- that I finally started getting comfortable with change.

My greatest business lesson so far has been the fact that you never know whether what you are doing is going to succeed or not, but you should keep in mind that at the end of the day, you cannot fail and you cannot fall, you can only learn.  

Tell us about your toughest day in business, what challenges did you face and how did you solve it?

First, there have been so many tough days, I almost fail to pick one. My business is extremely people-centric, which basically means, people’s opinions matter a lot.

On my toughest day, I’d done the makeup on a bride and she was very happy with my work. However, during her function, someone took a few unflattering pictures of my bride- it was a case of a bad camera, poor angles, and very bad lighting- and posted those pictures on social media.

Social media can be great for business but in some instances, it can also be the cause of great anxiety, especially if you are being bullied. I got a lot of negative feedback and my brand was vilified, it was very heartbreaking because I knew that my bride had been very pleased with the work I’d done for her.

Eventually, though, some beautiful pictures were posted and my brand was exonerated which proved to me that when you do good work, that will always stand as a witness.

What’s the next step for Mona Faces?

Mona is going to be doing many more master classes. At the start of this journey, I didn’t know that my brand would grow to this level, and right now, I feel that there are many more young people that are now where I was two years ago and I would love to be able to teach them how to get to the next level.

I also see myself producing my very own makeup line in the future.

As a bonus question, Mona was asked what advice she would give to all those hoping to follow in her footsteps and start their own makeup artistry brand; here was her inspirational advice…

“Start where you are with what you have. When I started, I literally had a little bag with one tube of lipstick, one eyeliner stick and one small box of powder, and with that, I was able to book my first bride and slowly add to my inventory.

I taught myself how to do makeup through YouTube and by following international makeup artists on social media. You can never know until you start, so you need to just start.

Do not fall into the trap of waiting for the perfect time, the right amount of startup capital, the right client etc., just start and slowly you will see yourself move from one level to the next”.


If you’d like to share your story with She Leads Africa, let us know more about you and your story here

Pap Culture: The Youtube channel giving a face to South African youth culture

pap culture
@Tumi_06 gets the inside scoop on @PapCultureSA, we've always wondered how they do it Click To Tweet

Created in July, 2015, Pap Culture is a Cape Town based YouTube channel founded by Thembe Mahlaba (host), Nwabisa Mda (host) & Bongeka Masango (videographer). The channel was created as an entertainment platform that the trio felt was missing on the YouTube platform, especially in South Africa.

Thembe and Nwabisa were interested in starting a podcast channel and once Bongeka moved to Cape Town last year, they realized that they we were all interested in creating a content platform online and YouTube just felt like the right fit.

These three are opinionated young black women who thought, “why not?”. And Pap Culture was born.


Who and what is Pap Culture?

Pap Culture has four segments on the channel:

  • Pap Culture Talks, an open and diverse conversation with two or more guests, who help unpack a topical issue.
  • Pap Culture On Location, captures events. People at the event/location are interviewed and asked quick fire questions relating to the theme of the month.
  • Pap Culture Ride Along, a guest is invited to join Thembe and Nwabisa in a car ride where they indulge in an informal conversation to get to know the guest and discuss matters relating to topical issues and aligns with the theme.
  • Pap Culture Reacts, led by Bongeka, Nwabisa & Thembe answer a select number of questions or react to a video, photo or tweets relating to a specific theme/trending topic.

The direction of the channel has definitely moved in a way that we both never anticipated (upon reflection). Yet in many ways, this felt right and intuitive to who we are and how we want to create/entertain.

At the core we want to have fun and bring about a humorous side to issues that people often shy away from. We wanted a platform that allows us to tell our story and understanding of South African youth culture. A platform that truly represents what it means to be South African through engaging and interactive conversations. Ultimately, our vision is to change the documented narrative of African youth culture.

@PapCultureSA wants to change the documented narrative of African youth culture Click To Tweet

What is the one thing you appreciate most about youth culture in South Africa and the continent?

Bongeka: I appreciate how unique it is. In as much as we are influenced by the world around us, we are still interested in being authentically African. We have found a way to combine our African identities with trends around the world.

Thembe: Active Participation. We are smart and becoming more informed the more we start talking about current affairs and issues that concern us as people. Now, we are able to join the political conversation not with an invite, but by forcefully bringing ourselves to the table.

We are voting and making our voices heard, trying to keep our governments accountable of the promises they are trying to keep/not keep. Also, we are protesting for our rights. We are just going out there and doing what we believe is needed for us to live in a better society for ourselves and the families we want to bring into the world.

Nwabisa: It’s honest. So much is going on in South Africa at the moment. I love how we are unapologetic about our approach to life and we’re honest about our lives and the things we face (both positive and negative). Also I appreciate the need to tell these stories, facing these challenges head on and really fighting for change now.

I think there’s been a huge shift from what was perceived as a lazy generation and young people have shown how empowered we really are. I think young people are still very misunderstood, but so many are making great strides to speak out and tell their stories. There’s a collective support and encouragement pushing for more young people to continue to own who they are and just be themselves.

thembe-mahlaba
Thembe Mahlaba
bongeka-masango
Bongeka Masango
nwabisa-mda
Nwabisa Mda

If you had to do a television programme in a different country what would it focus on?

Bongeka: It would depend on which country I’m in. If it were an African country, I’d do something fictional. I find we really love hearing stories so it would be interesting to tell stories to  a new audience.

If I were in the UK I’d be interested in making a game or a talk show simply because they do so well over there. I’d love to be in a studio full of people engaging in the game or talk show.

Thembe: This is a hard one. But I think one of these three options. A talk show, a variety show kind of like our YouTube channel or a comedy drama series focusing on creating a positive African identity.

Nwabisa: Comedy…always comedy. I don’t consider myself the most conceptually creative person. Especially from a creating from scratch point of view in terms of TV and script writing and all that stuff that goes into making the shows people are obsessed with for years and years. But I love a good laugh…a good long laugh that has you breathless and in tears.

So honestly any kind of comedic series that collaborates with people with great senses of humour from all parts of Africa and that has a great representation of different cultures, would be pretty epic.

Which episode of Pap Culture has been most memorable for you and why?

Bongeka: The most memorable episode has to be the Mission Possible episode, that was part of the Project Find A Bae series. Simply because I was not expecting the day to turn out like that. Although I don’t look like it, I was quite impressed with the ladies for pulling it all off.

 

Thembe: This answer changes a lot depending on if there is an episode that outdoes the last most memorable. But right now it would have to be the episode with Khanyi Mbau. She is a South African celebrity who hosts a weekend talk show with radio and television personality Phat Joe.

This episode stands out as she was literally just being herself and not a celebrity version of herself. We assumed the latter based on the persona we have seen on tabloids and pop culture news. She took her wig off. Like how much more real can you get?!

Nwabisa: This is tough cause I love all our episodes. I think my answer changes all the time, but I will definitely have to give two. First, Pap Culture Ride Along – Problematic Men in Entertainment with visual artist, Laura Windvogel a.k.a Lady Skollie. Simply because Skollie told it like it is.

Her candid and brutally honest approach is so refreshing. While it may be unexpected for people who are probably very conservative,  it is really a breath of fresh air. The topic was so important for all of us to engage with, especially with the on-going conversations around rape culture in South Africa. Also considering the need to call out men who continue to oppress women in all walks of life and in all types of ways. We joined an already existing conversation and it was really enlightening.

 

Then on a lighter side, definitely the 5 Minute Make-up Challenge with Cynthia Gwebu. One because I love love love Cynthia, she is a beauty and lifestyle vlogger who has amazing content. And two, the episode was just HILARIOUS to say the least.

Our Twitter account exploded with feedback from people who loved the collaboration and loved the laugh, mostly because they were laughing at me because I looked crazy at the end of the episode. I highly recommend this episode.

What is the biggest misconception about South African culture or youth you have addressed on your show and why?

Bongeka: The biggest misconception is that we are apathetic and don’t care to talk about anything serious or current. In our videos we’ve shown that, as young people we have dimensions and it’s not all fun and games all the time.

We’ve had a range of topics ranging from serious to light-hearted conversations showing that we are multi-faceted.

Thembe: That we are lazy. We are not lazy! We are just being labelled names so as to diminish our increasingly voiced opinions about topics that we are deemed not fit to comment on, like politics and social taboos.

Nwabisa: Honestly, I think our entire channel answers to the misconception that young people are lazy and not focused. We found a gap and we have really made it work hard for us and the support has been really amazing.

We and many others out there have shown that we are working hard to change our lives and the lives of those around us. I think more and more powerful examples of young people are coming out, which can only mean great things for other kids that need positive examples to look up to.

Building an online community: 16 practical strategies for growth

Building an online community-1

When starting up a business, it can be very challenging getting the attention of potential customers, suppliers and business partners, especially when it’s just you screaming from the rooftops. Once you get some visibility via social media and the press, then people start to take you more seriously and there may be some light at the end of the first tunnel in the startup game.

But how do you get visibility online when you’re starting from scratch? Don’t worry. We’ve developed a guide thanks to our year of trial, error and tribulation on how to build an online community from zero to 15,000 and counting. We’ve pulled together 16 strategies with tangible examples from the SLA toolbox on how to develop a concept, use social media tools and online networking to get the word out and use your fans as brand ambassadors.

We originally presented this class at Social Media Week Lagos. But based on the feedback from the session, we just knew we had to share it with everyone.

SMW Lagos Feedback

SMW Lagos Feedback

Topics this guide will cover:

– Who you should be targeting on social media and how to find them

– How to create an online voice that is true to your brand and helps you stand out

– How to set up experiments and make sure you’re learning from your past mistakes

– What you can do to become an active participant on social media and bring people to your brand

– The top tools and platforms to help you reach more people faster


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