Five African Women in the Creative Industries You Should be Following On Instagram

The modern African woman is not just a doctor, lawyer or UN project manager. She is in true millennial style – an artist at heart, who crave side hustles that doubles as her creative outlets.

More than ever, African women on the continent and of the diaspora are slaying roles in writing, art direction, creative marketing, architecture, and design.

If you’re looking for jobs at agencies who work on projects that reflect your home or want to stay posted on artistic journeys in the continent’s creative hubs, keep reading this article.

Here are five women in the creative industries you should know about, contact and work with! Click To Tweet

Asiyami Gold

Asiyami Gold is one of the continent’s most notable Instagram influencer’s who is consistently revered in hundreds of comments for being authentic and inimitable in her storytelling as well as her work.

Her personal storytelling does not hold an essentialist, romantic nor exotic gaze of the continent.

Rather, everything she does, from her presets to her consulting, shows the continent the way it is— a mix of technological innovations and idiosyncratic socio-economies, with a shared political history.

Gold is the Founder and CEO of the creative agency A Gold Studio and has worked with clients like Furla, Pantene, HERE map and Christian Cody.

Amy Sall

Amy Sall is the founder of digital magazine SUNU:  forthcoming print and digital publication.

 Even before the launch of the Journal, Sall’s tens of thousands of Instagram followers have known her best for making pre-colonial and historic media (film, TV, photography, interviews, reports etc) from the continent accessible by sharing images and stories that scream “for us, by us and of us”—foreshadowing the meaning of “sunu”, the Wolof word for “our”. 

Chidera Eggerue AKA @theslumflower

Chidera or @theslumflower is the award-winning author of the book What a Time to be Alone, a speaker, and an all round epicentre for inspiration, tough love and ultimately self-love.

A few months ago, a friend of mine suggested that I follow @theslumflower on Instagram, and my life has never been the same since!

Sis is all about being unapologetically self-loving, creative, independent and successful.

If you want to write, design or create but you’re feeling like as an African woman, there are certain worries that you work through alone, then following @theslumflower will give you enough inspiration to turn your #hotgirlsummer into a #hotgirlyear.

Mamy Tall

Mamy Tall is a Senegalese powerhouse, an architect, a photographer, and art director whose work has been featured on Livingly and Le Petit Journal

In December 2018, Tall’s art direction for the music video of Nix’s Highlander, won Video of the Year at the Galsen Hip Hop Awards.

Mamy Tall’s instagram content is a mix of architectural design and inspiration, art direction, photography, fashion, a non-replicable tourist eye and all round African excellence. 

Nadia Marie Sasso

Nadia Marie Sassois an unconventional digital storyteller from Sierra Leone based in Los Angeles.

She often combines critical writing and research with digital media in film, music, and fashion. Named among Katie Couric’s “Next Generation of Female Leaders”.

Sasso’s recent film Am I: Too African to be American or Too American to be African? has been featured on media platforms, such as Centric, Jet, The Huffington Post, Blavity, The ColorLines, OkayAfrica, Black Enterprise, and AfroPunk— and recognized by film festivals nationally and internationally.

Sasso’s journey is one of triumph— one quick scroll through her IG, and you’re bound to overcome any mood you’re in and want to slay your start-up goals.


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Robinah Nansubuga: My main drive is to always create alternative spaces

The African art scene in Africa is growing, developing and more exciting than ever.

With many African artists making a name for themselves – both at home and around the world – how does one get into the art scene when not being an artist yourself?

Robinah Nansubuga is an Independent Curator and Set Designer based in Kampala, Uganda. She implements strategies to promote artists and develop the artistic network in East Africa.

She has curated and led artistic projects across the continent and the world. Robinah was the artistic director of MTN Nyege Nyege 2018 – a festival organized with grants from the British Council.

This Motherland Mogul is also a former committee member for Laba! Street Art Festival, Arterial Network Uganda Chapter, a judge curator at the National Civil Society Fair art Competitions (CSO), co-curator of the Kampala Contemporary Art festival – and much more arts festival across the region.


How did you become an independent curator of arts festivals?

I have always been a huge fan of festivals they were my get away from everything that one place that I felt included and happened to forget the things happening home and in my life at that time.

After having worked for two galleries in Kampala (Afriart and fas fas gallery) I became an independent curator in 2012. I wanted to experience art in a space where audiences and makers get to meet.

Therefore I started curating ‘’EKYOTO UGANDA ‘’ during the Bayimba International Arts festival. Ekyoto was a bonfire project that I curated to bring together people through games like ‘’Dulu’’ – which today would come close to being a pool table.

Integrating the social aspects with Ugandan traditional ways of entertainment turned out to be a big success.

From there, I started to think and focus on how to create arts and cultural events that are inclusive and show a variety of art forms.

What skills do non-artists need to make it in the arts sector?

Organizational skills! Arts festivals usually do not have big budgets. So being efficient, conscious of costs and committed to timelines are key to make any festival a reality.

Also, it’s very important that you are good at collaborating. Festivals are all about collaborations, not only with the other people on the team – but also with the artists and don’t forget the audience.

Successful arts festivals can only be realized by listening to all involved because in that way new ideas can develop.

I would also suggest that it’s good to develop some creative skills yourself. This will help you understand who you are working with and it will help you develop your own creative vision.

And finally, practical skills – from basic electrician know-how to carpentry and designing – will always come in handy during the actual festival.

Tell us how you develop your own vision and execute that vision?

I am fortunate by now I get invited by festivals to work with them because I have built a name for myself through my vision.

Through the exhibitions, I created my main drive is always to create alternative spaces. My vision developed over the years.

Whenever I would attend arts of the cultural festival I would look for the things I felt were missing and that would have been of added value to the festival and the audiences.

However, when being approached by a festival you usually have to work in teams meaning that the vision is not yours alone.

What have been your biggest challenges in the cultural scene? And how did you overcome these challenges?

Being a woman who looks really young definitely didn’t help. I really had to push hard to make sure my ideas were not being undermined, but actually listened to.

It’s a very male-dominated sector so as a woman you have to bring yourself to think like a man, be able to do all the physical and mental jobs they can do in order to have a smooth working relationship.

Another challenge that needs political navigation is that the cultural scene can be very much of a clique scene at times.

This can mean that collaborating with on one project, might mean you are not able to be involved in another.

That is one of the main reasons why I became an independent curator as I’d like to focus on the work instead of potential conflict of interests.

I believe that sooner or later, every challenge can be overcome. You can start by educating yourself, trying to surround yourself with the right people who believe in your goals.

And, at times you have to be ready to compromise while staying passionate. plus let your work speak more for you.

I am lucky I earned my respect in the industry and for that am still very thankful to many artists and people that still believe and believed I could do more than I was doing.

You recently curated the Kigali Photo Fest. How did you decide what to include in the exhibition?  

Kigali Photo Fest has a vision and mission that really resonated with me. It’s about celebrating Africa’s diversity through photography as a medium of art.

The theme of the first edition was ‘In search of relevance – locality and remediation’ – which is about sharing and navigating ideas of identity, memory, experience, intimacy, presence, and connection, in order to co-opt a narrative through a selection of subject matter and presentation.

They present a historically, socially significant moment and can frame the conversation around those moments, therefore, it wasn’t so difficult to include.

We approached artists with the vision and the theme of the festival and many responded positively.

It is a special project that hopes to include many African photographers and teach photography as a medium of art to earn its respect, to start looking for new audiences and to mostly tell stories about other places in Africa that one might not be able to visit but have an idea through images.

Therefore it is about the continent sharing with each other.

Was your family always supportive of your dream to pursue a career in the cultural and arts sector?

My dad and mum met in drama school, but my father ended being a Mechanical Engineer.

So my father understood the appeal of arts and culture to be he said you also have to be able to look after yourself financially.

We really need to educate our families to be our first fans, audiences and to be the next big support systems we can depend on.

We also have the responsibility to take the effort and be patient to teach them so that not only our families but also our societies, can better understand.

In this video, Robinah shares more about collaborations within the East Africa art sector, establishing a creative vision during the last Nyege Nyege festival in Kampala.

This video was produced in cooperation with the British Council.


This article was written by Marthe van der Wolf

What went down at the #IAMORIGINAL Boss Brunch & Panel – Johannesburg

Curated within the beautiful landscape of Jozi on a peaceful Sunday, She Leads Africa in partnership with The Cut Life and Originals by Africa’s Best held a Boss Brunch and panel with the finest Motherland Mogul influencers of Africa.

The location was a hidden oasis of tranquility, The Gabriela’s Tea Room, perfect for some girl chat, champagne was flowing, the crowd was buzzing. What a beautiful Sunday.

In the era of feminism and self-love, you do find some false prophets that don’t live up to their campaign inside as loudly as they may be online.

What was important about the #IAMORIGINAL panel and brunch was that it focused on the challenges black women struggle through.

The theme that stood out from the event was the need for women to back each other up and actually mean it.

For the older and younger generation to join minds and create solutions for the Motherland Moguls that follow.

The event kicked off with a warm welcome from the bubbly Shanon Stanislaus of Originals by Africa’s Best. She spoke about the benefits of their new Coconut Creme range that has nutrition rich formulas, helping your natural hair with the foundation its needs for hair goals.

I tried some of the samples from the gift bag and I am sold on the products, which are available from Clicks nationwide or through The Originals by Africa’s best website.

We then proceeded into an hour-long networking bingo session, that had our Influencers and Motherland Moguls buzzing through the room, the energy was so lively- It felt like the best girl chat session I’ve been to in ages.

We held bingo cards that had questions such as “Who in the room has three pets, Who is an only child”. These were great ice breakers, especially for an introvert like myself.

Back to our tables, we were served incredible dishes by The Gabriela’s Tea Room patrons, everything delicious and mouthwatering.

This amazing panel was moderated by Tahira Joy of The Cut Life joined by Shanon Stanislaus (Originals by Africa’s Best), Enhle Mbali (Actress), Azania Mosaka (Broadcaster) and Jamelia Donaldson (Founder of Treasure Tress).

They spoke on self-care and beauty, ways to effectively run your business and respect yourself and values in the process.

We all got a few tips on how to reach your next Boss level in entrepreneurship through their stories, lessons and best practices.

Azania Mosaka dropped so many nuggets that had all the women in agreement throughout.

“Stick to your values and you’ll always win" – @Azania_ Click To Tweet

In the entertainment industry women are made to choose to get ahead either giving their bodies or having to dumb down their intellect so at to seem less of a threat to colleagues.

As shocking as it may sound, these are challenges most women are still overcoming.

A recurring theme throughout the Boss brunch and panel was how women need to remain educated and curious in our endeavors and not forgetting the people we build our dreams with.

“If you’re starting your race, be invaluable to your team.” – Shanon Stanislaus..

There’s only so much you can do as an individual, once you realize your expertise is invaluable, the impossible is just as attainable as anything.

We truly are better together.

On the theme of staying curious in what your interests are, Jamelia Donaldson of Treasure Tress stated…

You don’t know what you want to do until you’ve tried it all”. Click To Tweet

“ You don’t know what you want to do until you’ve tried it all”.

This tied in so well with the events hashtag of the day #IAMORIGINAL, when you apply yourself and work on what your secret sauce is, what do you really have to lose ?

All in all, this was an event, unlike any other networking event I have been to, which is saying a lot as I have been to a ton of networking sessions and gone home feeling as though I barely received much value from the speakers.

It could be just how intimate the brunch was or the fact that everyone left their egos at the door and simply wanted to celebrate each other.

I have nothing but praise for what these women aimed to share through the event and I believe that we can all learn from them.

As Motherland Moguls we are constantly inspiring those around us, we may not realize it a lot of the times, the best thing we can do is live an intention-driven life in our goals, decisions, and actions.

Work within the passion and not ego, power or status.

I’m definitely looking forward to more events from these powerhouses.


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